Honors & Awards

ALONZO ASHLEY

ALONZO ASHLEY

DAVID L. DILL

DAVID L. DILL

JENNIFER WIDOM

JENNIFER WIDOM

PERSIS DRELL

PERSIS DRELL

W. GARY ERNST

W. GARY ERNST

MARK A. HOROWITZ

MARK A. HOROWITZ

ROGER SHEPARD

ROGER SHEPARD

ANTHONY D. WAGNER

ANTHONY D. WAGNER

BARRY WEINGAST

BARRY WEINGAST

ALONZO ASHLEY, a retired employee relations manager at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), has received a 2005 Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics and Engineering Mentoring (PAESMEM). Ashley originated and developed the SLAC Summer Research Program for underrepresented minority undergraduates in science, technology, engineering and mathematics—now called the Department of Energy Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship Program. He also was responsible for SLAC's charter membership in the National Consortium for Graduate Degrees for Minorities in Science and Engineering.

The programs Ashley pioneered resulted in SLAC's recruitment and retention of at least 10 African American Ph.D. physicists and dozens of minority master's degree-level engineers, computer scientists, mathematicians and environmental scientists, according to the National Science Foundation (NSF), which administers the PAESMEM award. NSF also lauded Ashley for initiating partnerships with the National Society of Black Engineers, the Tech Museum of Innovation in San Jose and numerous historically black colleges and universities. John Marburger, director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy, presented the award Nov. 16 at a ceremony in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building in Washington, D.C.

KYLE COLE has been named associate director of Stanford's Center for Probing the Nanoscale, which supports science and engineering at the scale of the nanometer—one billionth of a meter, roughly the size of atoms and molecules. He will lead the center's educational and public outreach programs, spearhead industrial collaborations and promote expansion of bio-nano research. Associate Professor KATHRYN MOLER, applied physics and physics, is the center's director; Assistant Professor DAVID GOLDHABER-GORDON, physics, its deputy director. With a doctorate in biology from Yale, Cole has taught courses in organic chemistry, botany and evolutionary biology. Recently, he taught a course on the origin of life for the Stanford Continuing Studies Program. He is a college director for Stanford's Freshman-Sophomore College. Cole previously led a research group exploring new applications for DNA microarrays at the Santa Clara biotech company Affymetrix.

DAVID L. DILL, professor of computer science and, by courtesy, of electrical engineering, and JENNIFER WIDOM, professor of computer science and of electrical engineering, have been named fellows of the Association for Computing Machinery for their contributions to computing and information technology. Dill was praised "for contributions to system verification and for leadership in the development of verifiable voting systems." Widom was lauded "for contributions to active and semi-structured database systems." They will receive their awards May 20 in San Francisco at the association's annual awards banquet.

PERSIS DRELL, professor and deputy director of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), has been selected as one of three recipients of Wellesley College's 2006 Alumnae Achievement Awards. With screenwriter Nora Ephron and astronaut Pamela Melroy, Drell will receive her award Feb. 10 on the Wellesley campus. An internationally renowned physicist, Drell received a bachelor's degree in mathematics from Wellesley in 1977 and a doctorate in physics from the University of California-Berkeley in 1983. After conducting particle physics research on the Cornell University faculty, she joined SLAC in 2002, becoming the first woman to serve as its associate director of research. In 2005, she was named SLAC's deputy director and director of the Particle and Particle Astrophysics Division.

W. GARY ERNST, the Benjamin M. Page Professor of Earth Sciences, Emeritus, has been named the recipient of the 2006 Roebling Medal, the highest award given by the Mineralogical Society of America. A past president of the society, Ernst was recognized for scientific eminence as represented primarily by publication of outstanding original research in mineralogy. In addition, he will become a Life Fellow of the society.

MARK A. HOROWITZ, the Yahoo! Founders Professor in the School of Engineering, has been named winner of an award bestowed by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). A professor of computer science and of electrical engineering, he will receive the IEEE Solid-State Circuits Technical Field Award in February for "pioneering contributions to design of high-performance digital integrated circuits and systems." The institute extolled Horowitz's "seminal contributions in areas such as computer architecture, semiconductor memory, the modeling of large scale digital circuits, the design and modeling of low-power VLSI circuits and systems, and the design of circuits for high-performance data links."

ROGER SHEPARD, the Ray Lyman Wilbur Professor, Emeritus, has been selected as the 2006 recipient of the David E. Rumelhart Prize, which will be presented by the Cognitive Science Society during its annual meeting in Vancouver in July. The prize, which carries a $100,000 award, is given annually for "outstanding contributions to the formal analysis of the human condition." The prize is funded by the Robert J. Glushko and Pamela Samuelson Foundation in San Francisco. Glushko earned a doctorate in cognitive psychology in 1979 under the supervision of Stanford psychology Professor Rumelhart. Rumelhart, who retired from Stanford in 1998 after he was diagnosed with a degenerative brain disease, made major contributions to the formal analysis of the human cognition.

ANTHONY D. WAGNER, assistant professor of psychology and neuroscience, has been awarded the 2006 American Psychological Association Distinguished Scientific Award for Early Career Contribution to Psychology in the area of cognition and human learning. Wagner, who shares the award with Brian J. Scholl of Yale University, will receive the honor during a ceremony at the association's annual convention in New Orleans in August. Recipients of this award may not have held a doctoral degree for more than nine years.

BARRY WEINGAST, the Ward C. Krebs Family Professor and a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, has been awarded the 2006 William H. Riker Prize in Political Science by the University of Rochester. The award is given biennially by the university's Political Science Department "in recognition of scholarly achievement that exemplifies and advances the scientific study of politics in the spirit of William H. Riker and the department that he helped to build." The award, which includes a $3,000 prize, will be presented this spring. Weingast is an expert in political economy and public policy, the political foundation of markets and economic reform, U.S. politics and regulation.