Cardinal Chronicle

JOAN FRIEDMAN runs the Stanford Volunteer Clearinghouse, a service that matches departments on campus that need an extra hand with alumni, according to the skills and interests they list in their profiles. Friedman's database includes almost 860 active volunteers around the country who have expertise in everything from marketing and researching to web designing. Plus, some wayward alumni are looking to reconnect with the campus or their community and are eager to volunteer. Even the university's new Bill Lane Center for the Study of the North American West benefited from the high-tech expertise of several volunteers on file at the clearinghouse, Friedman said. "What surprises us is that we have alums with all different needs and all different skills," said Friedman, assistant director of volunteer relations. "We're just trying to make it as easy for the campus as possible." To find out more, Friedman can be contacted in the Office of Alumni Volunteer Relations at 736-0544 or joanf@stanford.edu.

Join the Stanford Historical Society for a walking tour of the historic San Juan Neighborhood on Sunday, May 1. The event coincides with the release of the group's latest book, Historic Houses III: San Juan Neighborhood, Stanford University, which features 128 pages of photos, sketches and histories of the homes, their designers and the original owners. All the homes were built in the 1920s and most are Tudor style, although a few reflect Spanish and Italian designs. Illustrations throughout the book by student BYRON FEIG, who graduates in June, bring the stories to life. The tour goes from 1 to 4 p.m. and will include strolls through four homes and their gardens. Pre-tour tickets are available for $20 each if orders are received by Monday, or for $25 on the day of the event. For more information, visit http://histsoc.stanford.edu/.

Before the Faculty Senate got down to discussing software systems and stem-cell research on April 14, a rowdy bunch of past senate chairs barged into the meeting to give assistant academic secretary TRISH DEL POZZO her due—congratulations for 25 years of service at Stanford and a generous thanks for more than two decades of dedication to the governing body. Professor BRAD OSGOOD, a former senate chair, ordered Del Pozzo front and center, whereupon she received a gift certificate from the gang of ex-gavel bangers and a standing ovation from the serving senators. The certificate must be used at the Stanford Shopping Center, which, Del Pozzo says, makes the gift perfectly acceptable.