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Stanford Report, October 3, 2001

In memory of Stanford's deceased laureates



Felix Bloch, physics (1952); died 1983; with Edward Mills Purcell "for their development of new methods for nuclear magnetic precision measurements and discoveries in connection therewith." Bloch, a professor of physics, came to Stanford in 1934 and became emeritus in 1971.


Paul Flory, chemistry (1974); died 1985; "for his fundamental achievements, both theoretical and experimental, in the physical chemistry of the macromolecules." Flory, a professor of chemistry, came to Stanford in 1961 and became emeritus in 1975.
Robert Hofstadter, physics (1961); died 1990; "for his pioneering studies of electron scattering in atomic nuclei and for his thereby achieved discoveries concerning the structure of the nucleons." Hofstadter, a professor of physics, came to Stanford in 1950 and became emeritus in 1985.
Linus C. Pauling, chemistry (1954); peace (1962); died 1994; at the time of the awards at the California Institute of Technology; chemistry: "for his research into the nature of the chemical bond and its application to the elucidation of the structure of complex substances"; peace: for his efforts to bring about an international ban on nuclear testing and to promote world peace. Pauling, a professor of chemistry, came to Stanford in 1969 and became emeritus in 1975.
Arthur L. Schawlow, physics (1981); died 1999; with Nicolaas Bloembergen "for their contribution to the development of laser spectroscopy." Schawlow, a professor of physics, came to Stanford in 1961 and became emeritus in 1991.
William Shockley, physics (1956); died 1989; at the time of the award at the Semiconductor Laboratory of Beckman Instruments; with John Bardeen and Walter Houser Brattain "for their researches on semiconductors and their discovery of the transistor effect." Shockley, a professor of electrical engineering, came to Stanford in 1963 and became emeritus in 1975.