Stanford Report Online



Stanford Report, October 4, 2000
Faculty appointments and promotions at School of Medicine announced

BY JOYCE THOMAS

Appointments and promotions approved at Advisory Board meetings in July and August include these eight faculty members in the School of Medicine.

Axel T. Brunger, PhD, has been appointed professor of molecular and cellular physiology and of neurology and neurological sciences and at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, with tenure, effective July 2000.

Brunger received his doctorate in biophysics from the Technical University of Munich, Germany, in 1982. After completing postdoctoral fellowships at Harvard University and the Max-Planck Institute for Biochemistry, Brunger joined the molecular biophysics and biochemistry department at Yale University in 1987, achieving the rank of full professor in 1993. He has made seminal contributions to structural biology, particularly to protein structure refinement and to the elucidation of the structures of proteins and protein complexes important for the fusion of membranes involved in the release of neurotransmitters at synapses. Brunger, a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator, joined the Stanford faculty this summer.

Peter N. Kao, MD, PhD, has been promoted to associate professor of medicine (pulmonary and critical care medicine), with tenure, effective August 2000.

Kao received his PhD in biochemistry in 1986 from Columbia University and his medical degree in 1988 from Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. His postdoctoral work included a residency in internal medicine, a Howard Hughes fellowship and a fellowship in pulmonary and critical care medicine, all at Stanford. He served as an acting assistant professor beginning in June 1992 and was appointed to the faculty at Stanford as of April 1993. His research focuses on gene regulation of immune responses. He has identified and cloned two novel DNA-binding proteins (NF45 and NF49) that regulate cytokine production, and he has achieved recognition as an expert in cytokine gene expression in bronchial epithelial cells. Kao received the Donald E. and Delia B. Baxter Award in 1995.

Ami Laws, MD, has been promoted to associate professor of medicine (general internal medicine) at the Medical Center effective September 2000 through August 2005.

Laws, who is an alumna of Stanford School of Medicine, class of 1983, interned and completed a residency in internal medicine at Stanford University Hospital. She served as a fellow with the Stanford Center for Research in Disease Prevention and in the Division of Endocrinology, Gerontology and Metabolism. In 1993 she became an acting assistant professor, and in 1994 she was appointed to the Medical Center faculty. Since then Laws has served as a primary care physician with the Stanford Medical Group and as a periodic attending on the general medicine inpatient service. In addition to clinical care of a large cohort of patients and special expertise in the care of patients with diabetes mellitus, Laws has made significant scholarly contributions, focusing in particular on the problem of insulin resistance.

Robert E. Mindelzun, MD, has been promoted to professor of radiology at the Medical Center effective August 2000.

Mindelzun received his MD from the State University of New York, Syracuse, in 1965. He interned at the New England Medical Center, Boston, and completed a residency in diagnostic radiology at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York. For 19 years he served as a member of the Valley Radiologists Medical Group and as director of radiology at Santa Clara Valley Medical Center. Mindelzun joined the Stanford University Medical Center in 1990. He serves in the Department of Radiology as director of the residency program and medical student education. His scholarly work is in the field of gastrointestinal radiology, and he is a recognized expert in CT imaging in acute abdominal disorders. His current work focuses on the use of novel high-resolution and three-dimensional CT techniques.

Glenn D. Rosen, MD, has been promoted to associate professor of medicine (pulmonary and critical care medicine), with tenure, effective September 2000.

Rosen received his medical degree in 1983 from the University of Pennsylvania. His postdoctoral work included a residency in internal medicine at Graduate Hospital in Philadelphia and clinical and research fellowships in pulmonary medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, and Washington University, St. Louis, as well as a fellowship with the Cardiovascular Research Institute at UCSF. He joined the Stanford medical faculty in 1993. His research focuses on apoptosis and signal transduction pathways that mediate cellular survival and proliferation, including the characterization of substances that preferentially enhance tumor cell (over normal cell) death and reduce inflammatory response.

Stephen J. Ruoss, MD, has been promoted to associate professor of medicine (pulmonary and critical care medicine) at the Medical Center effective July 2000 through June 2005.

Ruoss received his medical degree in 1981 from the University of Washington School of Medicine. His postdoctoral training included a residency in medicine at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Boston, where he served as chief resident, and clinical and research fellowships in pulmonary and critical care medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. At Stanford he served first as an acting assistant professor and then joined the medical faculty in April 1994. His clinical duties include attending in the intensive care unit, on the pulmonary subspecialty inpatient consultation service and in outpatient clinics that focus on the care of patients with pulmonary diseases. His research includes studies of the role of mast cell tryptase in various pulmonary diseases.

Peter M. Small, MD, has been promoted to associate professor of medicine (infectious diseases and geographic medicine), with tenure, effective August 2000.

Small received his medical degree in 1985 from the University of Florida School of Medicine. He completed a residency in internal medicine, serving as chief resident, and a fellowship in clinical pharmacology at the University of California, San Francisco, before joining Stanford in 1990 as a fellow in infectious disease. In 1994 he became an acting assistant professor and in 1997 he became an assistant professor in the tenure line. His research focuses on tuberculosis, a re-emerging major health threat with the recent appearance of MTB (Mycobacterium tuberculosis) drug resistant strains and the increased susceptibility of AIDS patients to the disease. Small served on the Institute of Medicine Committee on the Elimination of Tuberculosis in the United States and currently serves on the executive committee of International Collaborations in Infectious Diseases of the National Institutes of Health.

Douglas Vollrath, MD, PhD, has been promoted to associate professor of genetics, with tenure, effective Septem-ber 2000.

Vollrath received an MD and a PhD in biochemistry at Stanford in 1989. He served as a postdoctoral fellow at the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Cambridge, Mass., and in 1993 he returned to Stanford as an assistant professor. He was a Hume Scholar at the School of Medicine and a Basil O'Connor Scholar of the March of Dimes Foundation. This year he received the Basic Vision Research Project Award of the Karl Kirchgessner Foundation. Vollrath's research focuses on understanding the molecular mechanisms that underlie human eye disease. His group has identified mutations in a transcription factor, LMX1B, that appear to explain the association of Nail-Patella syndrome and certain open-angle glaucomas.