All Stories

Stanford’s Robot Makers: Andrew Ng

Andrew Ng is an adjunct professor of computer science at Stanford University. In his first decade at Stanford, he worked on autonomous helicopters and the STAIR project. He is now focusing on applications for artificial intelligence in many areas, including health care, education and manufacturing. This Q&A is one of five featuring Stanford faculty who work on robots as part of the project Stanford’s Robotics Legacy.

Stanford’s Robot Makers: Oussama Khatib

Oussama Khatib is a professor of computer science at Stanford University and leads the Robotics Lab. His projects have included cooperative robots, Romeo and Juliet, and the diving robot, OceanOne. He is also interested in autonomous robots, human-friendly robotics, haptics – bringing the sense of touch to robotics – and virtual and augmented reality research. This Q&A is one of five featuring Stanford faculty who work on robots as part of the project Stanford’s Robotics Legacy.

Graduate School of Business —

Why the Fed won’t cave

The president is browbeating the Federal Reserve, but a Stanford finance professor says it’s a bad idea that won’t work.

Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies —

Scholars examine cyber warfare in new book

War is changing, and the U.S. military can now use cyber weapons as digital combat power. Many experts conclude that research, scholarship, and more open discussion need to take place on the topics and concerns involved.

To save native grasslands, study invasive species

The order of arrival determines which invasive grasses predominate, according to a combination of experiments and computational modeling. The results could help in efforts to preserve the native plants that remain.

Historian Harold Kahn dies at 88

Harold L. Kahn, a professor emeritus who helped create a generation of leading U.S. scholars in Chinese and Japanese history, died on Dec. 11.

Predicting, preventing preterm births

Stanford’s top obstetricians, neonatologists, geneticists, microbiologists, immunologists, epidemiologists, health policy experts and bioengineers are investigating the basic science of preterm birth. Aiming to predict and prevent many preterm births, their goal is to help more babies arrive safely.