Archive for the ‘Best of’ Category

From Stanford magazine: What you might not know about Stanford’s barber

June 6th, 2014
Headshot of Carmelo Cogliandro, Stanford barber

Carmelo Cogliandro (Photo by Shaun Roberts for Stanford magazine.

For the past half-century, CARMELO COGLIANDRO has had clippers and comb at the ready as one generation after another has taken a seat in his chair at Stanford Hair, the barbershop he now owns. Cogliandro, 73, has counted some of the biggest names on the Farm as friends and clients, including the past six Stanford presidents and enough Nobel Prize winners to field a softball team. If he has his way, he won’t be leaving anytime soon.

College cuts run in the family

As a kid, Cogliandro swept the floors in his dad Antonio’s 14-chair barbershop in Harvard Square before the family moved to Palo Alto. In 1955, the elder Cogliandro set up shop in the new Town & Country mall across from campus. “He always worked around educated people,” Cogliandro says. “It’s the best clientele.”

Communication is key

Cogliandro instructs his staff to be like good detectives to find out what customers really want. One tactic: shock. If a new customer asks for it short, which could mean any of a dozen lengths, you reply with “Like a Marine boot-camp cut, right?” he says. That usually prompts a quick clarification. In general, he says, a barber’s ears matter even more than his or her hands. “If you’re a good listener and you ask enough questions, you’ll be successful.”

Music was his first love

As a keyboardist and vocalist, Cogliandro dreamed of a music career. He eventually majored in music at San Jose State, and he sang tenor with the San Jose Civic Light Opera for years. His dad, though, had urged him to have something to fall back on, so Cogliandro first went to barber college. He arrived at Stanford as an apprentice in 1961, working in the basement of Encina Hall. A year later, the shop moved to the brand-new Tresidder Union. He’s been there ever since.

He could write a book  – but won’t

Cogliandro has cut the hair of every Stanford president dating back to J. E. WALLACE STERLING. Provost JOHN ETCHEMENDY is a regular, as are a dozen or so Nobel and Pulitzer Prize winners. Alumna CHELSEA CLINTON used to stop in, as did political science and business Professor CONDOLEEZZA RICE. After JIM HARBAUGH, former head football coach,  left Stanford, he asked Cogliandro to make a trip to the 49ers headquarters to cut his hair. A campus author once asked the barber if he’d consider co-writing a book about his experience. “Are you out of your mind?” Cogliandro responded. “I would never do that. I wouldn’t even tell my wife,” he says.

Times have changed   – and he has too

In the early ’60s, his male customers all asked for some version of extremely short—be it crew cut, flattop or Ivy League. Then the Beatles hit. Cogliandro remembers the day things began to change: A student came in and insisted that his ears remain covered, a request that made the barber practically gasp. “I was thinking to myself, ‘Boy, in this business, you get every kind of weirdo there is,’” Cogliandro says. “I had the hardest time leaving it.” Five years later, he had hair “down to here” himself.

Gerhard Casper has great hair

Cogliandro keeps his secrets, though he freely divulges that of all the Stanford presidents he’s worked with, GERHARD CASPER had the best hair “bar none.” The well-coiffed German-born scholar returns the compliment: “He does not only understand hair but also human nature.”

 — BY SAM SCOTT, Stanford Magazine

Graduate School of Education’s Center for Education Policy Analysis wins $4 million grant

June 4th, 2014

The Center for Education Policy Analysis (CEPA) at Stanford Graduate School of Education (GSE) has won a $4 million grant from the Institute of Education Sciences, the research arm of the U.S. Department of Education. The funding will support about 30 doctoral students and promote the latest skills in education policy research with two- and four-year fellowships in a variety of disciplines.

Michelle Reininger, assistant professor of education and executive director of CEPA, will be a co-director of the federally funded training program.

Michelle Reininger, assistant professor of education and executive director of CEPA, will be a co-director of the federally funded training program. (Photo courtesy Graduate School of Education.)

The award advances a new emphasis in federal education research – to encourage closer partnerships between universities and school districts. The goal is to accelerate the translation of research findings into practice. Stanford, which was notified by the institute in May, is one of five universities nationwide to receive such an award.

“School districts and colleges often need rapid answers to practical questions involving school policies, such as

how to train teachers and how to direct limited resources,” said SEAN REARDON, professor of education and, by courtesy, of sociology. Meanwhile, he added, researchers have traditionally asked questions that are often of broad scholarly or policy interest with limited immediate practical application for districts.

“We think there is a sweet spot where these questions overlap,” explained MICHELLE REININGER, assistant professor of education and CEPA’s executive director. “Our students work to answer these questions using data from school districts or educational organizations that not only offer much-needed practical solutions for schools, but also inform answers to broad, scholarly questions, as well.” Reardon and Reininger are co-directors of the federally funded training program.

The new award follows a five-year grant from the federal institute, made in 2009, that helped CEPA and the GSE to establish the Stanford Interdisciplinary Doctoral Training Program in Quantitative Education Policy Analysis. This next round of funding, again for five years, enables the program to continue its mission of training doctoral candidates to use rigorous quantitative research methods for education policy analysis.  And it comes as the GSE is strengthening its partnership with the San Francisco Unified School District while GSE faculty members continue relationships with dozens of other districts nationwide.

Education Professor Sean Reardon

Education Professor Sean Reardon will co-direct the training program.

Students in the program will be drawn from the GSE and from social science disciplines across campus, including sociology, political science and psychology. Its focus is to identify potential solutions to the challenges facing educational institutions at all levels, from public school districts struggling to close racial achievement gaps to community colleges redefining their role in higher education.

Read the full story on the Graduate School of Education’s website.

 

ANDREW MYERS, for the Graduate School of Education

Stanford baseball heads to NCAA Super Regional following comeback

June 3rd, 2014

Stanford freshman TOMMY EDMAN hit a walk-off two-run home run on Tuesday, securing a 5-4 win for the Cardinal baseball team over Indiana University.  The play sends Stanford to the NCAA Super Regional next weekend in Nashville to face Vanderbilt in a best-of-three series.
“It was a fantastic win for us,” said MARK MARQUESS, the Clarke and Elizabeth Nelson Director of Baseball at Stanford. “Very proud of our team the way we battled back, and we beat an outstanding team.”

Edman, a switch-hitter, blasted a home run from the left side of the plate for the first time in his life, he said after the game. The shortstop said he was “just trying to get on base, to be honest. Home run was the last thing I expected.”

Read more on the Stanford Athletics website.

 

Doctoral candidates in the Stanford Graduate School of Education win national dissertation fellowships

June 2nd, 2014

Two dooctoral students at Stanford Graduate School of Education – ERIC TAYLOR and ILANA UMANSKY  –  have been awarded National Academy of Education/Spencer Dissertation Fellowships for 2014-2015.

About 600 students applied for the highly competitive dissertation grants, which went this year to 31 candidates, according to the NAEd, which administers the awards in partnership with the Spencer Foundation. The program “aims to identify the most talented researchers conducting dissertation research related to education,” the group says. The fellowships provide $25,000 in support for such work on the history, theory or practice of formal or informal education.

Eric Taylor

Eric Taylor

Taylor and Umansky are in the interdisciplinary education research program offered through Stanford’s Center for Education Policy Analysis.

Taylor studies the economics of education, and conducts research on personnel in the education sector. Working with co-authors, he had two papers recently in the American Economic Review:The effect of evaluation on teacher performance” and “Information and employee evaluation: Evidence from a randomized intervention in public schools.” Prior to Stanford, he worked at Harvard University’s Center for Education Policy Research, and at the Los Angeles Education Partnership. He received a masters in public policy from from UCLA.

 

Ilana Umansky

Ilana Umansky

Umansky’s research combines policy analysis, sociological theory and quantitative methods to shed light on the educational opportunities, experiences and outcomes of immigrant and English learner (EL) students. She has examined such subjects as course access, language of instruction, reclassification, and the impact of the EL label. She works in close partnership with school districts, grounding her research in questions and responses that support greater educational equity and excellence for immigrant and EL-classified students. She recently co-authored a paper with GSE professor Sean Reardon: “Reclassification patterns among Latino English Learner students in bilingual, dual immersion and English immersion classrooms.”

Umansky has worked with the World Bank, the Organization of American States, Research Triangle Institute, and Sesame Workshop and has conducted educational equity and quality research in Nicaragua, Mexico, Colombia, El Salvador and other countries in Latin America. She has a master’s degree from Harvard Graduate School of Education and a master’s in sociology from Stanford.

Umansky’s grant proposal is titled “Peeling back the label: Studies of educational opportunity among students learning English.”

To learn more about the winners’ dissertation projects, visit the full story on the Graduate School of Education’s website.

 

Laurette Beeson wins Fidler Award for contributions to Stanford Student Affairs

May 28th, 2014
Laurette Beeson Photo Laurette Beeson (Photo: Joy Leighton/Student Affairs)

Laurette Beeson won the 2014 Margaret Ann Fidler Award.  Photo Laurette Beeson (Photo: Joy Leighton/Student Affairs)

The nameplate had just been sealed onto her plaque for the Amy J. Blue Award when LAURETTE BEESON learned that she had received another honor last week.

On Tuesday, May 20, Beeson, an assistant dean for graduate life, was awarded the Margaret Ann Fidler Award for Distinguished Service in Student Affairs. The highest honor given in the Division of Student Affairs, the Fidler award honors a staff member who demonstrates an extraordinary dedication to the division and the mission of the university.

Established in 2000 in honor of MARGARET ANN FIDLER, a former associate vice provost for student affairs, the award recognizes individuals who demonstrate extraordinary integrity and a commitment to teamwork.

Each year, the award is a well-guarded secret until it is announced at a May meeting.

Beeson was very surprised when her name was announced by Fidler, who was on hand to personally give the award. KEN HSU, assistant vice provost for student affairs, was sitting at the table with Beeson and said he could not look at her for fear that she would realize she was this year’s honoree.

The awards committee selected Beeson for nearly 25 years of dedicated service in Student Affairs, “continually demonstrating her commitment, collaboration, patience, flexibility, compassion, respect and results,” the citation read.

“These are the tenets of what Laurette continues to demonstrate as she performs her duties and contributes to her many campus engagements with graduate students, undergraduate students, faculty, staff, parents and others. That there is nothing she will not offer to assist with, no task that is too complicated or difficult for her to tackle, and no topic that she will shy away from for the benefit of the Stanford community, was also one of the main factors in her selection for this award,” the citation continued.

— BY ELAINE RAY

 

Stanford Professor Jo Boaler wins math education prize

May 22nd, 2014
Jo Boaler

Jo Boaler

JO BOALER, professor of mathematics education at Stanford Graduate School of Education, has been awarded the Kay Gilliland Equity Award  by the National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics (NCSM).

The international organization, made up of leaders in the field of mathematics education, cited Boaler for her contributions to equity in mathematics education and leadership in attacking current problems in mathematics curriculum and supervision. Her work examines how traditional math instruction methods, which emphasize drilling and memorization, deter many students from excelling in the field. Known for her efforts to champion more collaborative approaches, she gave a presentation at the organization’s recent annual meeting titled, “Cutting through the smoke screen: Erasing mathematics inequality through research and action.”

According to the NCSM website, the award was established in 2013 to honor Kay Gilliland, a California math teacher who served as the group’s president and was a founding member of the professional development program, EQUALS, at the Lawrence Hall of Science, University of California, Berkeley. Boaler, the author of seven books including What’s Math Got To Do With It? and The Elephant in the Classroom, has started offering courses online to present more interactive and hands-on approaches to teaching and learning mathematics. In addition to offering an online course for teachers and parents, she is also preparing to offer an online course for students called “How to Learn Math: For Students.”

Read the original story on the Stanford Graduate School of Education’s website.

 

 

Rodgers wins Ben Hogan Award as the best colleagiate golfer

May 21st, 2014
Patrick Rodgers

Stanford golfer Patrick Rodgers

Junior PATRICK RODGERS has been named winner of the 2014 Ben Hogan Award by the Colonial Country Club, the Friends of Golf and the Golf Coaches Association of America.

The Ben Hogan Award is presented annually to the top men’s NCAA Division I, II or III, NAIA or NJCAA college golfer, taking into account all collegiate and amateur competitions during the 12-month period dating from the previous award’s banquet. The Ben Hogan Award selection committee is made up of 24 leaders and experts in amateur, college and professional golf.

The first honoree in Stanford history, Rodgers is the world’s top-ranked amateur golfer, according to both the World Amateur Golf Ranking and the Scratch Players World Amateur Ranking. Teammate CAMERON WILSON was a finalist for the award.

In 11 tournaments this year, Rodgers, the Pac-12 Player of the Year, boasts nine top-10 finishes and a stroke average of 69.41. On the amateur circuit, he was a member of the winning United States Walker Cup and Palmer Cup teams in 2013 and finished with a 5-1-2 record. Last summer, he was the medalist at the Western Amateur and reached the round of 16 in match play at both the Western Amateur and the United States Amateur. In addition, he tied for 15th place at the PGA Tour’s John Deere Classic last July.

Visit the GoStanford website to learn more and to watch a video in which Rodgers offers a few tips for succeeding on the challenging Stanford Golf Course.

More than 2,034 Stanford bicyclists participate in Bike to Work Day

May 19th, 2014
Bike to Work Day at Stanford, May 8, 2014

Bike to Work Day at Stanford, May 8, 2014 (Photo courtesy of Parking & Transportation Services)

During the Bay Area’s 20th annual Bike to Work Day on May 8, Stanford’s bicycle program recorded 2,034 bicycle commuters and 133 walkers coming onto campus. Bicyclists logged a total of 8,783 miles and averaged nearly 11 miles per trip. By biking instead of driving, these commuters eliminated an estimated 7,958* pounds of CO2 emissions that day.

Riders and walkers stopped at one of a dozen Stanford Energizer Stations, which were co-hosted by the university, Stanford Hospital, Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.  To date, more than 420 Stanford bicyclists have pledged to wear their helmets for every ride and follow the rules of the road.

Stanford affiliates who take Stanford’s bike safety pledge during May, National Bike Month, will be entered into a drawing to win a free Breezer Downtown EX bicycle. The deadline to pledge is May 31. Parking & Transportation Services will conduct prize drawings for Bike to Work Day and the bike safety pledge on June 9.

* The per-mile emissions factor used for automobiles is 0.411 kg CO2/mile (or 0.906 lb. CO2/mile). This is based upon an average passenger vehicle fuel economy of 21.4 mpg (2011) figure from U.S. Bureau of Transportation Statistics).

 

Stanford graduating seniors Hunter Kodama, Chiney Ogwumike, win Alumni Association’s Sterling Award

May 16th, 2014
Howard Wolf, director of the Stanford Alumni Association with Hunter Kodama, '14, a 2014 Sterling Award winner.

Howard Wolf, president of the Stanford Alumni Association, with Hunter Kodama, ’14, a 2014 Sterling Award winner. He shared the award with Chiney Ogwumike ’14.

Graduating seniors HUNTER KODAMA and CHINEY OGWUIMKE have received the Stanford Alumni Association’s 2014 J.E. Wallace Sterling Award for outstanding service to Stanford.
HOWARD WOLF, president of the Alumni Association and vice president for alumni affairs, presented the awards at the SAA Board Meeting on Thursday, May 15.
Kodama, who will graduate with a bachelor’s degree in public policy, has been actively involved in campus life. He was a Junior Class President, a Freshman Transition Coordinator, a four-year member of the Dance Marathon planning team, the 2014 Associated Students elections commissioner and is currently a Senior Gift co-chair.
“He’s both an individualist and entrepreneurial. He is the definition of what it is to be a student leader at Stanford,” one of his nominators wrote. Other references commented on his warmth and humility, compassion, work ethic, genuine nature and enthusiasm for Stanford.
The Sterling Award cites Hunter“…For the deep level of respect and trust afforded him by his classmates, due not only to the countless ways he has served them and his university, but also to the gracious sincerity and generous spirit he brought to this work.
Ogwumike, who will graduate with a bachelor’s degree in international relations, has been a stand-out student-athlete. She was a member of the varsity women’s basketball team for four years and received numerous honors on the conference and national levels. She was a captain of the team for two years, a member and committee co-chair of the Cardinal Council and was  an active participant in community volunteer engagements. She was the driving force behind Nerd Nation.
One of her nominators described some of the ways in which Chiney is a stand-out leader: “Chiney has a magnetic personality that makes people want to be around her.  Not only does she have high standards for herself, but also she helps make others around her better.  She is selfless, encouraging, motivating, inspiring and most of all, a person with unquestioned integrity.”
The Sterling Award cites Chiney for being an “incredible role model to young girls,” and “for teaching us all that life is about playing hard, working hard….And for saying with unmitigated love and pride ‘I am Stanford!’ while everyone everywhere agrees unanimously, ‘Yes, you are Stanford.’”
Ogwumike was unable to attend the May 15 dinner becasue she is busy training with the Connecticut Sun, the WNBA team that selected her as the Number One draft pick in April.
The Alumni Association presents the Sterling Award annually to a graduating senior whose undergraduate activities have made an impact on campus and who demonstrates the strong potential for continued service to the university and the alumni community. This is the first time since 1999 that the award has been presented to two seniors.
The award is named for the late J.E. Wallace Sterling, who served as Stanford’s president from 1949 to 1968.

 — BY CARA HANELIN, Stanford Alumni Association

Julie Kennedy wins award for excellence in teaching

May 15th, 2014
Julie Kennedy

Julie Kennedy (Photo: Linda A. Cicero)

Environmental Earth System Science professor JULIE KENNEDY has been awarded the 2014 Excellence in Teaching Award by the Northern California Association of Phi Beta Kappa. She is one of four teachers honored this year and the 12th Stanford professor to win the award.

Kennedy said that while she is delighted to be honored, it is the nomination by a former student that she finds to be most gratifying.

“The deepest honor is to have been nominated, to have a student say that what you did, the way you put yourself out there as a teacher and as a friend really mattered to me, and I want others to know about it,” she said. “That’s what really hits my heart.”

On its website, Phi Beta Kappa states that winners of the award “are those who have taught an especially memorable course, or who have had a special impact on the education, career, life, or who have been found inspiring or particularly admirable by a PBK member.”

ROSS FEEHAN, a Phi Beta Kappa member and a Stanford alumnus (2013, B.S. and M.S. in Earth Systems), said he nominated Kennedy for the teaching award because of her deep impact on him as a teacher, benefactor and mentor. “Julie is irreplaceable,” Feehan said. “The talent, vigor and commitment she brings to each of her roles at Stanford are astounding.”

As part of his senior seminar, Feehan worked with Kennedy to help a nonprofit organization in East Palo Alto build a sustainable business model for a farmer’s market in the city. “Julie became intimately involved in the project to ensure that it was mutually beneficial for the organization and my group,” Feehan said. “She attended our off-campus, 8 a.m. meetings and encouraged the students to recognize the complexity of challenges.”

Kennedy, who is also a co-director of the Haas Center for Public Service and a senior fellow at Stanford’s Woods Institute for the Environment, said that as a teacher, she doesn’t try to pull her students into her world.

“I try to meet them where they are and then ask ‘How am I going to help you become the best and most effective version of you that you can become?’” she said. “The steps we take toward figuring that out are not a quarter-long adventure, it’s a years-long adventure together.”

 — BY KER THAN,  associate director of communications for the School of Earth Sciences