Archive for the ‘Best of’ Category

Stanford baseball heads to NCAA Super Regional following comeback

June 3rd, 2014

Stanford freshman TOMMY EDMAN hit a walk-off two-run home run on Tuesday, securing a 5-4 win for the Cardinal baseball team over Indiana University.  The play sends Stanford to the NCAA Super Regional next weekend in Nashville to face Vanderbilt in a best-of-three series.
“It was a fantastic win for us,” said MARK MARQUESS, the Clarke and Elizabeth Nelson Director of Baseball at Stanford. “Very proud of our team the way we battled back, and we beat an outstanding team.”

Edman, a switch-hitter, blasted a home run from the left side of the plate for the first time in his life, he said after the game. The shortstop said he was “just trying to get on base, to be honest. Home run was the last thing I expected.”

Read more on the Stanford Athletics website.

 

Doctoral candidates in the Stanford Graduate School of Education win national dissertation fellowships

June 2nd, 2014

Two dooctoral students at Stanford Graduate School of Education – ERIC TAYLOR and ILANA UMANSKY  –  have been awarded National Academy of Education/Spencer Dissertation Fellowships for 2014-2015.

About 600 students applied for the highly competitive dissertation grants, which went this year to 31 candidates, according to the NAEd, which administers the awards in partnership with the Spencer Foundation. The program “aims to identify the most talented researchers conducting dissertation research related to education,” the group says. The fellowships provide $25,000 in support for such work on the history, theory or practice of formal or informal education.

Eric Taylor

Eric Taylor

Taylor and Umansky are in the interdisciplinary education research program offered through Stanford’s Center for Education Policy Analysis.

Taylor studies the economics of education, and conducts research on personnel in the education sector. Working with co-authors, he had two papers recently in the American Economic Review:The effect of evaluation on teacher performance” and “Information and employee evaluation: Evidence from a randomized intervention in public schools.” Prior to Stanford, he worked at Harvard University’s Center for Education Policy Research, and at the Los Angeles Education Partnership. He received a masters in public policy from from UCLA.

 

Ilana Umansky

Ilana Umansky

Umansky’s research combines policy analysis, sociological theory and quantitative methods to shed light on the educational opportunities, experiences and outcomes of immigrant and English learner (EL) students. She has examined such subjects as course access, language of instruction, reclassification, and the impact of the EL label. She works in close partnership with school districts, grounding her research in questions and responses that support greater educational equity and excellence for immigrant and EL-classified students. She recently co-authored a paper with GSE professor Sean Reardon: “Reclassification patterns among Latino English Learner students in bilingual, dual immersion and English immersion classrooms.”

Umansky has worked with the World Bank, the Organization of American States, Research Triangle Institute, and Sesame Workshop and has conducted educational equity and quality research in Nicaragua, Mexico, Colombia, El Salvador and other countries in Latin America. She has a master’s degree from Harvard Graduate School of Education and a master’s in sociology from Stanford.

Umansky’s grant proposal is titled “Peeling back the label: Studies of educational opportunity among students learning English.”

To learn more about the winners’ dissertation projects, visit the full story on the Graduate School of Education’s website.

 

Laurette Beeson wins Fidler Award for contributions to Stanford Student Affairs

May 28th, 2014
Laurette Beeson Photo Laurette Beeson (Photo: Joy Leighton/Student Affairs)

Laurette Beeson won the 2014 Margaret Ann Fidler Award.  Photo Laurette Beeson (Photo: Joy Leighton/Student Affairs)

The nameplate had just been sealed onto her plaque for the Amy J. Blue Award when LAURETTE BEESON learned that she had received another honor last week.

On Tuesday, May 20, Beeson, an assistant dean for graduate life, was awarded the Margaret Ann Fidler Award for Distinguished Service in Student Affairs. The highest honor given in the Division of Student Affairs, the Fidler award honors a staff member who demonstrates an extraordinary dedication to the division and the mission of the university.

Established in 2000 in honor of MARGARET ANN FIDLER, a former associate vice provost for student affairs, the award recognizes individuals who demonstrate extraordinary integrity and a commitment to teamwork.

Each year, the award is a well-guarded secret until it is announced at a May meeting.

Beeson was very surprised when her name was announced by Fidler, who was on hand to personally give the award. KEN HSU, assistant vice provost for student affairs, was sitting at the table with Beeson and said he could not look at her for fear that she would realize she was this year’s honoree.

The awards committee selected Beeson for nearly 25 years of dedicated service in Student Affairs, “continually demonstrating her commitment, collaboration, patience, flexibility, compassion, respect and results,” the citation read.

“These are the tenets of what Laurette continues to demonstrate as she performs her duties and contributes to her many campus engagements with graduate students, undergraduate students, faculty, staff, parents and others. That there is nothing she will not offer to assist with, no task that is too complicated or difficult for her to tackle, and no topic that she will shy away from for the benefit of the Stanford community, was also one of the main factors in her selection for this award,” the citation continued.

— BY ELAINE RAY

 

Stanford Professor Jo Boaler wins math education prize

May 22nd, 2014
Jo Boaler

Jo Boaler

JO BOALER, professor of mathematics education at Stanford Graduate School of Education, has been awarded the Kay Gilliland Equity Award  by the National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics (NCSM).

The international organization, made up of leaders in the field of mathematics education, cited Boaler for her contributions to equity in mathematics education and leadership in attacking current problems in mathematics curriculum and supervision. Her work examines how traditional math instruction methods, which emphasize drilling and memorization, deter many students from excelling in the field. Known for her efforts to champion more collaborative approaches, she gave a presentation at the organization’s recent annual meeting titled, “Cutting through the smoke screen: Erasing mathematics inequality through research and action.”

According to the NCSM website, the award was established in 2013 to honor Kay Gilliland, a California math teacher who served as the group’s president and was a founding member of the professional development program, EQUALS, at the Lawrence Hall of Science, University of California, Berkeley. Boaler, the author of seven books including What’s Math Got To Do With It? and The Elephant in the Classroom, has started offering courses online to present more interactive and hands-on approaches to teaching and learning mathematics. In addition to offering an online course for teachers and parents, she is also preparing to offer an online course for students called “How to Learn Math: For Students.”

Read the original story on the Stanford Graduate School of Education’s website.

 

 

Rodgers wins Ben Hogan Award as the best colleagiate golfer

May 21st, 2014
Patrick Rodgers

Stanford golfer Patrick Rodgers

Junior PATRICK RODGERS has been named winner of the 2014 Ben Hogan Award by the Colonial Country Club, the Friends of Golf and the Golf Coaches Association of America.

The Ben Hogan Award is presented annually to the top men’s NCAA Division I, II or III, NAIA or NJCAA college golfer, taking into account all collegiate and amateur competitions during the 12-month period dating from the previous award’s banquet. The Ben Hogan Award selection committee is made up of 24 leaders and experts in amateur, college and professional golf.

The first honoree in Stanford history, Rodgers is the world’s top-ranked amateur golfer, according to both the World Amateur Golf Ranking and the Scratch Players World Amateur Ranking. Teammate CAMERON WILSON was a finalist for the award.

In 11 tournaments this year, Rodgers, the Pac-12 Player of the Year, boasts nine top-10 finishes and a stroke average of 69.41. On the amateur circuit, he was a member of the winning United States Walker Cup and Palmer Cup teams in 2013 and finished with a 5-1-2 record. Last summer, he was the medalist at the Western Amateur and reached the round of 16 in match play at both the Western Amateur and the United States Amateur. In addition, he tied for 15th place at the PGA Tour’s John Deere Classic last July.

Visit the GoStanford website to learn more and to watch a video in which Rodgers offers a few tips for succeeding on the challenging Stanford Golf Course.

More than 2,034 Stanford bicyclists participate in Bike to Work Day

May 19th, 2014
Bike to Work Day at Stanford, May 8, 2014

Bike to Work Day at Stanford, May 8, 2014 (Photo courtesy of Parking & Transportation Services)

During the Bay Area’s 20th annual Bike to Work Day on May 8, Stanford’s bicycle program recorded 2,034 bicycle commuters and 133 walkers coming onto campus. Bicyclists logged a total of 8,783 miles and averaged nearly 11 miles per trip. By biking instead of driving, these commuters eliminated an estimated 7,958* pounds of CO2 emissions that day.

Riders and walkers stopped at one of a dozen Stanford Energizer Stations, which were co-hosted by the university, Stanford Hospital, Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.  To date, more than 420 Stanford bicyclists have pledged to wear their helmets for every ride and follow the rules of the road.

Stanford affiliates who take Stanford’s bike safety pledge during May, National Bike Month, will be entered into a drawing to win a free Breezer Downtown EX bicycle. The deadline to pledge is May 31. Parking & Transportation Services will conduct prize drawings for Bike to Work Day and the bike safety pledge on June 9.

* The per-mile emissions factor used for automobiles is 0.411 kg CO2/mile (or 0.906 lb. CO2/mile). This is based upon an average passenger vehicle fuel economy of 21.4 mpg (2011) figure from U.S. Bureau of Transportation Statistics).

 

Stanford graduating seniors Hunter Kodama, Chiney Ogwumike, win Alumni Association’s Sterling Award

May 16th, 2014
Howard Wolf, director of the Stanford Alumni Association with Hunter Kodama, '14, a 2014 Sterling Award winner.

Howard Wolf, president of the Stanford Alumni Association, with Hunter Kodama, ’14, a 2014 Sterling Award winner. He shared the award with Chiney Ogwumike ’14.

Graduating seniors HUNTER KODAMA and CHINEY OGWUIMKE have received the Stanford Alumni Association’s 2014 J.E. Wallace Sterling Award for outstanding service to Stanford.
HOWARD WOLF, president of the Alumni Association and vice president for alumni affairs, presented the awards at the SAA Board Meeting on Thursday, May 15.
Kodama, who will graduate with a bachelor’s degree in public policy, has been actively involved in campus life. He was a Junior Class President, a Freshman Transition Coordinator, a four-year member of the Dance Marathon planning team, the 2014 Associated Students elections commissioner and is currently a Senior Gift co-chair.
“He’s both an individualist and entrepreneurial. He is the definition of what it is to be a student leader at Stanford,” one of his nominators wrote. Other references commented on his warmth and humility, compassion, work ethic, genuine nature and enthusiasm for Stanford.
The Sterling Award cites Hunter“…For the deep level of respect and trust afforded him by his classmates, due not only to the countless ways he has served them and his university, but also to the gracious sincerity and generous spirit he brought to this work.
Ogwumike, who will graduate with a bachelor’s degree in international relations, has been a stand-out student-athlete. She was a member of the varsity women’s basketball team for four years and received numerous honors on the conference and national levels. She was a captain of the team for two years, a member and committee co-chair of the Cardinal Council and was  an active participant in community volunteer engagements. She was the driving force behind Nerd Nation.
One of her nominators described some of the ways in which Chiney is a stand-out leader: “Chiney has a magnetic personality that makes people want to be around her.  Not only does she have high standards for herself, but also she helps make others around her better.  She is selfless, encouraging, motivating, inspiring and most of all, a person with unquestioned integrity.”
The Sterling Award cites Chiney for being an “incredible role model to young girls,” and “for teaching us all that life is about playing hard, working hard….And for saying with unmitigated love and pride ‘I am Stanford!’ while everyone everywhere agrees unanimously, ‘Yes, you are Stanford.’”
Ogwumike was unable to attend the May 15 dinner becasue she is busy training with the Connecticut Sun, the WNBA team that selected her as the Number One draft pick in April.
The Alumni Association presents the Sterling Award annually to a graduating senior whose undergraduate activities have made an impact on campus and who demonstrates the strong potential for continued service to the university and the alumni community. This is the first time since 1999 that the award has been presented to two seniors.
The award is named for the late J.E. Wallace Sterling, who served as Stanford’s president from 1949 to 1968.

 — BY CARA HANELIN, Stanford Alumni Association

Julie Kennedy wins award for excellence in teaching

May 15th, 2014
Julie Kennedy

Julie Kennedy (Photo: Linda A. Cicero)

Environmental Earth System Science professor JULIE KENNEDY has been awarded the 2014 Excellence in Teaching Award by the Northern California Association of Phi Beta Kappa. She is one of four teachers honored this year and the 12th Stanford professor to win the award.

Kennedy said that while she is delighted to be honored, it is the nomination by a former student that she finds to be most gratifying.

“The deepest honor is to have been nominated, to have a student say that what you did, the way you put yourself out there as a teacher and as a friend really mattered to me, and I want others to know about it,” she said. “That’s what really hits my heart.”

On its website, Phi Beta Kappa states that winners of the award “are those who have taught an especially memorable course, or who have had a special impact on the education, career, life, or who have been found inspiring or particularly admirable by a PBK member.”

ROSS FEEHAN, a Phi Beta Kappa member and a Stanford alumnus (2013, B.S. and M.S. in Earth Systems), said he nominated Kennedy for the teaching award because of her deep impact on him as a teacher, benefactor and mentor. “Julie is irreplaceable,” Feehan said. “The talent, vigor and commitment she brings to each of her roles at Stanford are astounding.”

As part of his senior seminar, Feehan worked with Kennedy to help a nonprofit organization in East Palo Alto build a sustainable business model for a farmer’s market in the city. “Julie became intimately involved in the project to ensure that it was mutually beneficial for the organization and my group,” Feehan said. “She attended our off-campus, 8 a.m. meetings and encouraged the students to recognize the complexity of challenges.”

Kennedy, who is also a co-director of the Haas Center for Public Service and a senior fellow at Stanford’s Woods Institute for the Environment, said that as a teacher, she doesn’t try to pull her students into her world.

“I try to meet them where they are and then ask ‘How am I going to help you become the best and most effective version of you that you can become?’” she said. “The steps we take toward figuring that out are not a quarter-long adventure, it’s a years-long adventure together.”

 — BY KER THAN,  associate director of communications for the School of Earth Sciences

 

Stanford alumnus Michael Tubbs the subject of ‘True Son’ documentary; screening and discussion Sunday

May 14th, 2014

44345On Sunday, May 18, at 3:30 p.m. in CEMEX Auditorium on Stanford’s campus, there will be a screening of True Son, a documenatary that chronicles MICHAEL TUBBS‘s, campaign to win a seat on the Stockton, Calif. City Council.

Tubbs, ’12, MA ’12, ran for office while completing his bachelor’s degree in comparative studies in race and ethnicity and a master’s in the Graduate School of Education. He won the election in 2012, becoming the youngest person to gain a seat on that troubled city’s council.

True Son follows Tubbs’ campaign, which took place during a year of record homicides and impending bankruptcy. The film premiered at the 2014 Tribeca Film Festival.

In addition to the screening, Sunday’s event will include a panel moderated by Stanford President JOHN HENNESSY. The documentary’s filmmakers  – all Stanford grads – will participate in the discussion along with Tubbs himself. Tickets for the event are free, but registration requested. More details are available here:

Steven Chu, Stanford Nobel physicist, former U. S. energy secretary, elected to Royal Society

May 14th, 2014
Steven Chu (Photo: U.S. Department of Energy)

Steven Chu (Photo: U.S. Department of Energy)

Physicist STEVEN CHU, Stanford professor and Nobel laureate, has been elected as a foreign member of the Fellowship of the Royal Society, one of the world’s most prominent groups of scientists.

Chu is the William R. Kenan Jr. Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences. He is a professor of physics and of molecular and cellular physiology. The Royal Society is the world’s oldest scientific academy in continuous existence, and is made up of the most eminent scientists, engineers and technologists from the United Kingdom and the Commonwealth. Past fellows and foreign members have included Isaac Newton, Charles Darwin and Albert Einstein.

Outstanding scientists, including pioneers in molecular biology, biomedicine and solar cell technology, make up the 50 new fellows and 10 new foreign members announced by the Royal Society. Chu shared the 1997 Nobel Prize in physics for the development of methods to use lasers to cool and trap atoms. From January 2009 to April 2013 he was the 12th U.S. Secretary of Energy under President Barack Obama and has sought new solutions to energy and climate challenges throughout his career.

During his first turn as a professor of physics and applied physics at Stanford, Chu helped launch the Stanford Bio-X program and the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology. Now, Chu plans to engage students and faculty from across campus to develop ways to facilitate addressing the country’s energy problems, with a focus on new pathways to sustainable, carbon dioxide-neutral energy. The Chu Group will also continue its efforts in applying new biophysical techniques to the study of biological systems, with an eye toward disease research.

BY BJORN CAREY