Exemplifying what is ‘truly best’ about Stanford

Stanford’s ethnic community centers and the Alumni Association honored alumni who are giving back to their alma mater and paying it forward beyond the Farm.

At the 22nd annual Multicultural Alumni Hall of Fame induction ceremony during Reunion Homecoming, Stanford honored VICTOR ARIAS JR., MBA ’82; LADORIS HAZZARD CORDELL, JD ’74; GOODWIN LIU, ’91; and DONALD WARNE, MD ’95.

“Our honorees today exemplify what is truly best about Stanford,” LORIE CANCHOLA BOYD, ’94, a member of the Stanford Alumni Association Board of Directors, told faculty, staff, students and alumni gathered in Tresidder Memorial Union on Friday, Oct. 21.

Victor Arias
Victor Arias

Arias, who was selected by El Centro Chicano y Latino, is a senior client partner at Korn/Ferry International. He was hailed as a champion of Latino students and alumni, having served as vice chair of the Stanford Board of Trustees Task Force on Minority Alumni Relations and as a member of the Board of Directors of the Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity. Arias also has served on the Advisory Council of the Graduate School of Business and on the Business School Alumni Association Board of Directors. Arias said Stanford’s “earliest multicultural graduates” represent its longstanding legacy, noting that they “finished in the classes of ’95 and ’98. That’s 1895 and 1898.” He added, “The power of diversity is to embrace our differences, and inclusion must be the hallmark.”

LaDoris Cordell
Ladoris Cordell

Cordell, a retired judge of the Superior Court of California and the inductee of the Black Community Services Center, was celebrated for her career as a civil rights leader. She was the first lawyer to open a private practice in East Palo Alto. She also was credited with implementing a successful minority admissions program at Stanford Law School while serving as assistant dean for student affairs. After 19 years on the bench, Cordell retired and returned to Stanford as vice provost and special counselor to the president for campus relations, a position she held until retiring in 2009. Recently, Cordell served as the independent police auditor for the City of San Jose and as the chairperson of the Blue Ribbon Commission to Improve Jail Operations in Santa Clara County. Cordell implored the audience to remember the people who do “the real work” — those who maintain Stanford’s grounds, prepare the food and clean its facilities.

Warne is the chair of North Dakota State University’s Department of Public Health,

Donald Warne
Donald Warne

where he founded the country’s first Native Public Health graduate program. He also is an adjunct faculty member at Arizona State University’s Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law, specializing in American Indian health policy. He is the senior policy adviser to the Great Plains Tribal Chairmen’s Health Board and the first American Indian physician to be appointed to the American Cancer Society Board of Directors. He was honored for re-imagining and revitalizing the legacy of healing crafted by his Oglala Lakota ancestors who were medicine men and tribal healers from Pine Ridge, South Dakota.

Goodwin Liu
Goodwin Liu

Liu, chosen by the Asian American Activities Center, is an associate justice on the California Supreme Court. He was described as an inspired leader recognized for his expertise on issues of diversity, education and public service. Liu has served on the university’s Board of Trustees, working on such issues as investment responsibility and minority alumni relations. He also served as chair of the National Advisory Board of the Haas Center for Public Service. Liu noted Stanford’s commitment to its ethnic community centers: “Even as the campus suffered great budget cuts during the 2009 recession, this campus maintained its commitment to the four community centers we honor here today. So I think it’s worth saying that the university doesn’t just talk the talk, it walks the walk.”