Stanford Engineering student wins international competition for efforts to miniaturize ultrasound device

Henry Samueli, co-founder, chairman of the board and chief technical officer of Broadcom, with  Stanford graduate student Jonathon Spaulding
Henry Samueli, co-founder, chairman of the board and chief technical officer of Broadcom, with Stanford graduate student Jonathon Spaulding

A Stanford Engineering student won the $10,000 first place prize at the third annual Broadcom Foundation University Research Competition.

JONATHON SPAULDING, a Stanford doctoral  candidate in electrical engineering, hopes to build smaller, cheaper and more efficient handheld ultrasound systems.

“Imagine having these devices in every doctor’s office, or taking ultrasound scanners into the field where imaging technology is limited,” Spaulding said, adding that he is continuing work in hopes of developing a hardware prototype the size of a common flash drive.

He entered the international competition at the urging of his adviser,

BORIS MURMANN associate professor of electrical engineering.

“I have not in my PhD career entered any kind of research competition before,” Spaulding said.

He credited  YONINA ELDAR, a professor of electrical engineering at Technion, the Israel Institute of Technology, for laying the mathematical foundations for the approach he used in his research. Spaulding said his research seeks to provide a “hardware proof of concept for her work.”

Spaulding won after a round of three-minute presentations and poster sessions judged by engineers from Broadcom, a U.S. semiconductor company.  The graduate-level engineering competition, held at the beginning of the Broadcom Foundation’s annual Technical Conference, invited a dozen students to present their research to a panel of judges. The judges rated the competitors on their presentation skills, the quality and level of the science involved and the applicability of the projects in the real world. Second and third place prizes were awarded to students from Israel and Belgium, respectively.

 —AUBREY HANSON,  Stanford Engineering