Stanford’s 2013 Nobel laureates feted in Stockholm

 

Alexander Mahmoud / © Nobel Media AB
Stanford’s Thomas Südhof, professor of molecular and cellular physiology, won a Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.

 

Michael Levitt, professor of structural biology in the Stanford School of Medicine, won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry.
Michael Levitt, professor of structural biology in the Stanford School of Medicine, won a Nobel Prize in Chemistry.

MICHAEL LEVITT, professor of structural biology at the School of Medicine, and THOMAS SÜDHOF, professor of molecular and cellular physiology, were presented with 2013 Nobel Prizes at the Dec. 10 ceremony at the Stockholm Concert Hall.

Levitt, who earned the prize in chemistry, and Südhof, who earned it in physiology or medicine, had arrived in Sweden several days earlier to give their Nobel lectures at the Karolinska Institute and prepare for the ceremony, which was followed by a banquet at Stockholm City Hall.

During his banquet speech, Levitt, with characteristic levity, said he loves “the Swedish people for their detective novels, their archipelago, their sense of humor, their carbonated vodka and most especially for their wonderful hospitality.”

Levitt shared his prize, which was announced Oct. 9, with MARTIN KARPLUS, of the University of Strasbourg in France and Harvard University, and ARIEH WARSHEL, of the University of Southern California, “for the development of multiscale models for complex chemical systems.”

Südhof shared his prize, which was announced Oct. 7, with JAMES ROTHMAN, of Yale University, and RANDY SCHEKMAN, of UC-Berkeley, “for their discoveries of machinery regulating vesicle traffic, a major transport system in our cells.”

This item was originally posted on the School of Medicine’s news website.

Photos: Alexander Mahmoud / © Nobel Media AB