Research

New technique uses light to separate mirror-image materials

Left- and right-handed versions of molecules can be hard to tell apart but can have devastatingly different effects. The Dionne lab is developing an optical filter to sort these molecules, which could lead to purer and safer drugs and agrichemicals.

Digital companies and workers’ rights in an online world

Stanford scholars are addressing the future of how we work, with technology platforms and policies to protect workers’ rights and help employers properly assess employee qualifications as part of Stanford’s Cyber Initiative.

New portal for exploring California’s drought

A new web portal puts four years of California drought data into an interactive format, showing where regions met or missed water conservation goals. The idea is to motivate awareness and conservation.

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory —

AI analyzes gravitational lenses 10 million times faster

SLAC and Stanford researchers demonstrate that brain-mimicking neural networks can revolutionize the way astrophysicists analyze complex data, including distortions in spacetime that are crucial for our understanding of the universe.

Stanford Medicine —

Genome analysis with near-complete privacy possible

Stanford researchers used cryptography to cloak irrelevant genetic information in individuals’ genomes while revealing disease-associated mutations. The technique could vastly improve patient privacy.

Beyond the classroom

Each year about 1,000 Stanford undergraduates work closely with faculty mentors on research ranging from engineering and medicine to the humanities, fine arts and social sciences.

Studying alien ice on Earth

A flash of green laser followed by pulses of X-rays, and mere nanoseconds later an extraterrestrial form of ice has formed. The miniature crystal reveals how water solidifies under high pressures, like those expected in icy comets, moons and planets.

Stanford biologists warn of prelude to extinction

In the first such global evaluation, Stanford biologists found more than 30 percent of all vertebrates have declining populations. They call for curbs on the basic drivers of these losses.