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07/21/95

CONTACT: Stanford University News Service (415) 723-2558

Feigelson wins international crystal growth prize

STANFORD -- Robert S. Feigelson, research professor of materials science and engineering, has been awarded the top award for technological/experimental achievement by the International Organization for Crystal Growth (IOCG).

He is the third recipient of this honor, called the Laudise Prize, which is awarded every three years by the IOCG, a world organization representing about 3,000 scientists and engineers working in the area of crystal growth.

The prize was presented June 22 in the Netherlands during the IOCG's triennial meeting. According to the citation, Feigelson was recognized for his "outstanding, broad and widely acknowledged contribution to experimental crystal growth," in particular for his work with an extensive group of materials that have found application in lasers, non-linear optics and superconductors.

Feigelson has been active in crystal growth and materials processing for more than 30 years. He has worked with a variety of different materials -- ranging from semiconductors to optical materials to proteins -- using a number of processing techniques. He has written nearly 200 technical publications, received six patents and consulted extensively with both large corporations and small start-ups. He served as president of the American Association for Crystal Growth from 1981 to 1984 and edited the association's newsletter for 10 years. He is currently on the editorial board of the Journal of Crystal Growth.

Feigelson, a native of New York City, received his doctorate in materials science and engineering from Stanford in 1974. He worked as a staff scientist for the General Dynamics Corp., the U.S. Army and Sperry Rand before joining the Stanford faculty. While a graduate student at Stanford, he helped start a crystal growth laboratory in the Center for Materials Research that he returned to direct. It is now one of the largest university- based crystal growth facilities in the United States.

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