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10/01/93

CONTACT: Stanford University News Service (415) 723-2558

Familiar Russian interpreter Palazhchenko to lecture Oct. 7

STANFORD -- He has appeared countless times on television, his face has been on the front pages of all the major American newspapers, his voice has been heard explaining Russian foreign policy, but few Americans would recognize the name of Pavel Palazhchenko, the English language interpreter for Mikhail Gorbachev and Eduard Shevardnadze.

Palazhchenko will give a lecture on "The Future of Russian Foreign Policy" at 1 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 7, in the Red Room, second floor, Encina Hall. The lecture is sponsored by the Stanford University Center for Russian and East European Studies. It is free, open to the public and wheelchair accessible

Trained as a simultaneous translator for the United Nations in New York, Palazhchenko was attached to the section for military disarmament and political problems of disarmament in the United States and Canada Department of the former U.S.S.R. Ministry of Foreign Affairs, where he held the position of counselor.

In an interview in the Moscow News a few years ago, Palazhchenko said he was often weary after long sessions as a translator. President Gorbachev's talks with then U.S. Secretary of State George Shultz often lasted four or five hours and required precise translation.

Palazhchenko accompanied Gorbachev on his two visits to Stanford in 1990 and 1992.

Currently, Palazhchenko is translating Gorbachev's memoirs and acting as special adviser to the Gorbachev Foundation.

For further information, call the Center for Russian and East European Studies at 725-2563.

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