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12/14/92

CONTACT: Stanford University News Service (415) 723-2558

Stanford education dean named to Clinton transition team

STANFORD -- Marshall S. Smith, dean of Stanford University's School of Education, has been appointed to President-elect Bill Clinton's transition team in the Education, Labor, Arts and Humanities Cluster. Smith has been named as a "task force team leader" in the K-12 education group.

Smith will be studying federal education agencies in Washington and meeting with the Bush administration's education leadership. He will assess the administration's current education programs and prepare a snapshot of agency issues, policies, problems and opportunities for the new secretary of education and key appointees. The group is expected to complete its work by Dec. 22.

Smith is not new to educational policymaking in Washington: He is an adviser to the National Education Goals Panel and is a member of the National Council of Education Standards and Testing. In 1980, he was chief of staff and executive assistant to the first secretary of the U.S. Department of Education. Before that, he was assistant commissioner for policy studies in the U.S. Office of Education, where he developed legislative proposals, regulations, program plans and administrative actions for all aspects of federal involvement in education.

Before coming to Stanford in 1986, he was director of the Wisconsin Center for Educational Research.

Smith is currently taking a sabbatical year as a fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford, where he is writing about educational reform and policymaking. In the past, he has written about policy issues that included desegregation, early childhood programs, effective schools and the effect of federal policies on state and local practice.

Smith is a member of the National Academy of Education.

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