Print

Trustees approve construction projects, adopt new proxy voting guidelines

At the final meeting of the 2011 academic year, the Stanford University Board of Trustees approved several construction projects, as well as three recommendations from the university's Advisory Panel on Investment Responsibility & Licensing.

Boora Architects Artist rendering of the Bioengineering and Chemical Engineering Building

The Bioengineering and Chemical Engineering Building will be the final facility to be constructed in the new Science and Engineering Quadrangle (SEQ II).

BY KATHLEEN J. SULLIVAN

At its June 8-9 meeting, the Stanford University Board of Trustees approved a proposal to build a new $41.2 million computing facility to support research programs at the university and at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

It was one of several proposed construction projects that the board of trustees approved at its final meeting of the 2011 academic year.

In addition, trustees approved Stanford's fiscal 2012 budget.

"Provost John Etchemendy told us the same thing he told the Faculty Senate at his May 26 presentation – that the fiscal 2012 budget was a 'boring budget,'" said Leslie Hume, chair of the board of trustees, in a recent interview.

"The trustees response was: We're happy you produced a boring budget. After the financial tribulations of the last few years, it's a real credit to the leadership of President John Hennessy and Provost John Etchemendy to produce this kind of a budget – [a $203 million surplus on $4.1 billion in revenues, $3.8 billion in expenditures and $104 million in transfers] – so quickly after the tremendous financial reverses of 2008 and 2009."

Hume said trustees toured the new Knight Management Center at the Graduate School of Business (GSB) and held their Wednesday afternoon meeting in its new Bass Center, where they heard a report on the state of the school by GSB Dean Garth Saloner. The Bass Center, a four-story building on the new campus, includes classrooms, study and meeting rooms, a student lounge, dining facilities and the library.

"It's clear, first, that the new Business School curriculum really drove the construction of this new building, and the new building, in turn, led to further innovations in the management education provided by the Business School," Hume said. "The school itself is going to be even more open to, and more involved with, the larger university. It was a wonderful presentation. The facility is a tremendous addition to Stanford."

Investment responsibility issues

At the meeting, the board of trustees amended Stanford's four investment responsibility core social issues policy statements – diversity and non-discrimination, environmental sustainability, human rights, labor – by adopting standard wording that defines and covers corporate supply chains in each statement. The amendments were based on wording developed by the university's Advisory Panel on Investment Responsibility & Licensing.

Trustees also amended the Diversity & Non-Discrimination Proxy Voting Guideline by adding "gender expression" to the guideline that asks companies to adopt explicit equal employment opportunity polices to prohibit discrimination.

In addition, trustees amended the Human Rights Proxy Voting Guideline in the "country selection" section by making minor wording changes in the resolutions paragraph; adding supply chain wording in the description paragraph; and citing historic examples of inappropriate corporate behavior in certain companies.

Finally, trustees adopted two new proxy voting guidelines: one addressing diversity on corporate boards and another addressing adult and child worker health, safety and security.

Stanford Research Computing Facility

Trustees gave concept and site approval to the proposed Stanford Research Computing Facility, which will be located on SLAC's campus. The new building will support Stanford's goal of remaining at the forefront of scientific research in an era of increased reliance on computational models.

The building will encompass approximately 22,100 square feet in a two-story aboveground building. Its design and systems are modular to allow for expansion, as needed, for Stanford and SLAC programs. The flexible nature of the building's design means that it will be easy to adapt the facility's footprint to accommodate the anticipated growth in current and future equipment needs.

The proposed conceptual estimate of the project is $41.2 million.

It is anticipated that the project will return to trustees in October 2011 for design approval, and in December for a combined project and construction approval. Construction is expected to begin in early 2012 and to be completed by mid-2013.

Satellite Research Animal Facility

Trustees gave concept and site approval for the proposed Satellite Research Animal Facility, a one-story building.

The proposed conceptual estimate for the project is $27.5 million.

The proposed prefabricated facility, which is expected to be completed in December 2012, will remain in place until permanent facilities can be built to accommodate existing capacity and projected future growth.

The project is expected to return to trustees for design approval in October of this year and for a combined project and construction approval in December.

Stanford Auxiliary Library III

Trustees gave design approval – the second step in the approval process – for doubling the size of Stanford Auxiliary Library III, a climate-controlled storage facility in Livermore. The project's estimated value is $14.8 million.

Under the proposed expansion, the facility, best known as SAL3, would double its storage capacity to approximately 6 million volumes, up from about 3 million.

Materials at the facility, which is located about 50 miles from campus, are stored in size order, using barcodes for retrieval and storage, and are available to university borrowers through a paging service.

The SAL 3 project is expected to return to trustees for a combined project and construction approval in October. Construction is expected to begin in the winter of 2011 and to be completed in the winter of 2012.

Bioengineering and Chemical Engineering Building

Trustees gave design and partial construction approval for the Bioengineering and Chemical Engineering Building, the final building to be constructed in the new Science and Engineering Quadrangle (SEQ II).

The total budget for the project is set at $197.3 million.

The new building will be located on the northwest corner of the Science and Engineering Quad on the former site of the Ginzton Laboratory and the Applied Physics Building, which have been demolished. Mass excavation of the site will begin late this summer.

The new Bioengineering and Chemical Engineering Building will give the new Department of Bioengineering room to grow and will allow the Department of Chemical Engineering to vacate its aging facilities, which place serious limitations on new research directions – directions that will flourish at the new facility.

The primary feature of the new facility will be wet and dry laboratory spaces designed for intensive research for each of the departments, as well as shared specialty labs available to faculty based in other campus facilities.

Much like the Clark Center, the Bioengineering and Chemical Engineering Building is designed to encourage cooperation and teamwork. Students and faculty from the two departments will be interspersed throughout the building so they can pool their talents, training and passion for problem-solving.

The building will return to the trustees for project and final construction approval in April 2012. The building is expected to be completed in winter of 2014.

West Campus Recreation Center

Trustees gave project and partial construction approval to the West Campus Recreation Center.

Excavation, grading and utilities work on the site, located at the west end of Roble Field on Santa Teresa Street, is expected to begin in July.

The center would be similar in scope, design and size to the Arrillaga Center for Sports and Recreation, which is located on the east side of campus on Galvez Street.

The West Campus Recreation Center would be a 75,000-square-foot building. The conceptual estimate for the project is $35.5 million.

The center will be located near a thriving neighborhood of students living in residence halls, suites and independent houses.

Plans for the new center – a one-story building with a basement – include basketball courts; fitness, wellness and recreation space; and lockers and showers. In addition, plans call for a 50-meter swimming pool to replace Roble Gym pool.

The project is expected to return to the trustees for construction approval in October. The center is expected to be completed in December 2012.

Olmsted Staff Rental Housing

Trustees gave revised construction approval for the newly built Olmsted Staff Rental Housing project, based on projected final costs of $17.2 million, an increase of $1.2 million over the approved construction budget. The increase is due to donor-initiated and funded improvements to construction materials, quality and amenities.