Y2E2: New building sets sustainability standards for Stanford

L.A. Cicero Y2E2

The Jerry Yang and Akiko Yamazaki Environment and Energy Building

The official dedication of the Jerry Yang and Akiko Yamazaki Environment and Energy Building on March 4 underscores the university's broader commitment to finding ways to reduce its carbon footprint — its amount of greenhouse gas emissions — in the coming years. Here, you will find a collection of articles describing the new building, dubbed Y2E2, and the work that will happen inside it.

Sustainable Stanford

With its stone walls, covered arcades and clay roof tiles, the new Jerry Yang and Akiko Yamazaki Environment and Energy Building evokes architectural themes dating back more than a century to the founding of Stanford University and the construction of its signature Main Quadrangle.

How Stanford's sustainability czar will mobilize the campus

Joseph Stagner, the first executive director of the university’s new Department of Sustainability and Energy Management, answers questionsfrom the Stanford News Service about sustainability at Stanford.

New building to be hub for multidisciplinary studies

Nobody likes moving. There are boxes, things get lost, nobody can find your new office and the phone always takes longer to reconnect than planned. That said, the move to Y2E2 came as good news to environmental researchers. For them, the building promises the ability to work closely, in the physical

sense of the word, with colleagues in many disciplines.

How Y2E2 slashes energy and water consumption

The new Jerry Yang and Akiko Yamazaki Environment and Energy Building is projected to use 56 percent less energy and 90 percent less potable water for fixtures than a comparable structure built in a traditional fashion. But how will it eventually reach those goals?

Take a tour of the Y2E2 building's green features (pdf)

An architectural rendering helps to highlight the various innovative features that make Y2E2 a model of sustainability. They range from the use of recycled redwood to the four atriums that allow for natural heating and cooling.

Two buildings paved way for Y2E2

The Jerry Yang and Akiko Yamazaki Environment and Energy Building may represent the cutting edge of sustainability, but it is not the first “green” building on campus. It has two important, award-winning predecessors—and additional green construction is soon to be under way.

Alumni couple Yang and Yamazaki promote sustainability at Stanford

Stanford Trustee Jerry Yang, co-founder of Yahoo! Inc. and his wife, Akiko Yamazaki, contributed $50 million toward construction of the Y2E2 building, which encourages multidisciplinary research by bringing together wide-ranging expertise to take on difficult environmental challenges.