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Stanford scholars elected to American arts, sciences academy

William Dally

William Dally

Persis S. Drell

Persis S. Drell

Darrell Duffie

Darrell Duffie

Pat Hanrahan

Pat Hanrahan

Robert Pogue Harrison

Robert Pogue Harrison

Pamela S. Karlan

Pamela S. Karlan

Chaitan Khosla

Chaitan Khosla

Ivan A. Sag

Ivan A. Sag

The American Academy of Arts and Sciences (AAAS), one of the country's oldest honorary learned societies, announced this week the election of 203 new fellows and 24 new foreign honorary members, including eight Stanford University scholars—William Dally, Persis S. Drell, Darrell Duffie, Pat Hanrahan, Robert Pogue Harrison, Pamela S. Karlan, Chaitan Khosla and Ivan A. Sag.

Founded in 1780 by John Adams, James Bowdoin, John Hancock and other scholar-patriots, the academy has selected the finest minds and most influential leaders from each generation, including George Washington and Benjamin Franklin in the 18th century, Daniel Webster and Ralph Waldo Emerson in the 19th, and Albert Einstein and Winston Churchill in the 20th. An independent policy research center, the academy undertakes studies of complex and emerging problems. Current academy research focuses on science and global security, the humanities and culture, social policy and education.

The election of this year's class brings the number of Stanford scholars in the academy to 243.

William Dally, the Willard R. and Inez Kerr Bell Professor in the School of Engineering and chair of the Computer Science Department, is a recognized leader in the design of supercomputers and interconnection networks and is the father of stream processing, an emerging approach to computing. He teaches courses on computer architecture and computer design. His current research involves development of programming systems for parallel computers, a streaming supercomputer, a high-performance image and signal processor, and architectures and technologies for scalable networks. He has played a key role in founding several companies and since 1989 has worked with Cray Inc. on the development of its supercomputers. A fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers and of the Association for Computing Machinery, he received the ACM Maurice Wilkes Award in 2000 and the IEEE Seymour Cray Award in 2004. Dally came to Stanford in 1997 after teaching for 11 years in MIT's Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.

Persis S. Drell joined the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, where she is a professor and deputy director, in 2002. As director of the Particle and Particle Astrophysics Division, she oversees operations of the B-Factory, where experimenters are studying the differences between matter and antimatter; the construction of the Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST); the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology; the International Linear Collider effort and programs in accelerator research. She earned a bachelor's degree in mathematics/physics from Wellesley in 1977 and a doctorate in atomic physics from the University of California-Berkeley in 1983. After conducting high-energy physics experiments at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, she joined the faculty of Cornell's Physics Department in 1988. She has received a Guggenheim Fellowship and a National Science Foundation Presidential Young Investigator Award and is a fellow of the American Physical Society.

Darrell Duffie, the Dean Witter Distinguished Professor of Finance at the Graduate School of Business, has been a faculty member since earning his doctorate from Stanford in 1984. Duffie, co-director of the Credit Risk Executive Program, is the author of Dynamic Asset Pricing Theory (2001) and co-author of Credit Risk (2004). His recent research has focused on how capital moves from one segment of asset markets to another, and the implications of imperfect trading opportunities for asset price behavior, especially in over-the-counter markets. Duffie is a past director of the board of the American Finance Association, a fellow of the Econometric Society, a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research, a member of Moody's academic research committee and the 2003 IAFE (International Association of Financial Engineers)/Sunguard Financial Engineer of the Year. He is on the editorial boards of Econometrica and the Journal of Financial Economics.

Pat Hanrahan, the Canon USA Professor of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, is an expert in computer graphics and visualization technology. From 1986 to 1989 he was at Pixar, the company that produced Toy Story, and led the research team that developed the RenderMan computer program for generating realistic images. The development of RenderMan software won Hanrahan a Scientific and Engineering Award from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in 1992. He also has won the Spirit of America Creativity Award and the SIGGRAPH Computer Graphics Achievement Award. Hanrahan joined Princeton's Computer Science Department in 1989 and moved to Stanford in 1994, where his work has included development of a three-dimensional display system called the responsive workbench and a camera with digital processing that makes blurry images a thing of the past. The recipient of three university teaching awards, Hanrahan is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He leads Stanford's Regional Visualization and Analytics Center, established in 2005 to perform basic science and technology research to assist the Department of Homeland Security in identifying and thwarting terrorist threats to the nation.

Robert Pogue Harrison, the Rosina Pierotti Professor in Italian Literature, joined the faculty of the Department of French and Italian in 1986. He earned a doctorate in Romance studies from Cornell University in 1984. A revised, expanded version of his dissertation on Dante's Vita Nuova was published as The Body of Beatrice in 1988. His 1992 Forests: The Shadow of Civilization considers the role of the forest in the cultural imagination of the West since antiquity. In his Rome, la Pluie: A Quoi Bon Littérature? (published in Paris, 1994), two characters discuss such topics as art restoration, the vocation of literature and the place of the dead in contemporary society. His 2003 book, The Dominion of the Dead, has been called a profound meditation on how the thought of death shapes the communion of the living. He is a research affiliate with the Forum on Contemporary Europe.

Pamela S. Karlan, the Kenneth and Harle Montgomery Professor of Public Interest Law, is the founding director of Stanford Law School's Supreme Court Litigation Clinic. One of the nation's leading experts on voting and the political process, Karlan has served as a commissioner on the California Fair Political Practices Commission and as an assistant counsel and cooperating attorney for the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund. Karlan is the co-author of three leading casebooks on constitutional law and related subjects, as well as more than four dozen scholarly articles. She is a widely recognized commentator on legal issues and is frequently featured on programs such as the NewsHour with Jim Lehrer. Before joining Stanford in 1998, she was a professor of law at the University of Virginia School of Law and served as a law clerk to Justice Harry A. Blackmun of the U.S. Supreme Court and Judge Abraham D. Sofaer of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York. Karlan earned her bachelor's, master's and law degrees from Yale University.

Chaitan Khosla is the Wells H. Rauser and Harold M. Petiprin Professor in the School of Engineering, chair of the Department of Chemical Engineering, professor of chemistry and professor, by courtesy, of biochemistry. His research focuses on developing tools that lead to the discovery of new drugs to treat illnesses, such as celiac sprue, an autoimmune disease of the small intestine caused by exposure to gluten from wheat, rye and other grains. He also studies the biosynthesis of polyketides, a class of biomolecules found in a number of antibiotic and anti-cancer drugs. Khosla earned a bachelor's degree from the Indian Institute of Technology in 1985 and a doctorate in chemical engineering from the California Institute of Technology in 1990. He joined the Stanford faculty in 1992 after completing a postdoctoral fellowship at the John Innes Centre in the United Kingdom. A fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, his honors include the 1999 Alan T. Waterman Award.

Ivan A. Sag is a professor of linguistics, director of the Program in Symbolic Systems and a senior researcher at the Center for the Study of Language and Information. He has previously held fellowships at Stanford, the University of Chicago, Utrecht University and the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. The University of Bucharest named him Professor Honoris Causa in 2001, and in 2005 he received the Victoria A. Fromkin Prize from the Linguistic Society of America for his distinguished contributions to the field of linguistics. Trained originally in Sanskrit and Indo-European studies, Sag's research contributions have focused on grammatical theory, semantics and language processing. He is the author or co-author of 10 books and 100 articles. He is internationally known for his work on syntactic theory, which has centered primarily on constraint-based, lexicalist models of grammar, and their relation to theories of language processing. He earned his doctorate from MIT in 1976.

Other academy fellows elected this year include former Vice President Al Gore, former Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor, New York Times correspondent James Risen, Google chair and CEO Eric Schmidt, filmmakers Spike Lee and Robert Redford, astronomer Donald Brownlee, historian Nell Painter, international public health leader Allan Rosenfield and chef Alice Waters. This year's fellows and honorary members will be inducted on Oct. 6 at the academy's headquarters in Cambridge, Mass.

Cynthia Haven, Dawn Levy, Mark Shwartz and Lisa Trei contributed to this report.