Faculty, staff and students honored with Gores, Dinkelspiel, Cuthbertson awards

Lois Wagner

Lois Wagner

Tom Byers

Tom Byers

Max Kamenetsky

Max Kamenetsky

Virginia Matzek

Virginia Matzek

Adrienne Jamieson

Adrienne Jamieson

Sarala V. Nagala

Sarala V. Nagala

H. Jazmin Quill

H. Jazmin Quill

Vivian Fu-Ning Wang

Vivian Fu-Ning Wang

Two faculty members, four students, one lecturer and two staff members will be recognized June 12 at Commencement for their contributions to the university with the 2005 Gores, Dinkelspiel and Cuthbertson awards.

Cuthbertson AwardIn being named this year's recipient of the Kenneth M. Cuthbertson Award for Exceptional Contributions to Stanford, Lois Wagner, assistant vice president for public affairs and executive director of Stanford Events, was cited for her more than 20 years of distinguished service to the university.

Wagner was recognized for dedicated leadership as executive director of Stanford Events, where she has overseen an extraordinary number and range of events, including Commencement ceremonies, six years of centennial celebrations, university presidential inaugurations and performances by hundreds of artists, as well as for orchestrating the visits of prominent politicians, heads of state and royalty. She also was recognized for making Lively Arts a leader in arts presentation, engaging the campus and community with premiere performances and educational activities in music, dance and theater.

Wagner is set to retire this year. Her last day will be Aug. 31, 2005.

Gores AwardThe Walter J. Gores Award for Excellence in Teaching is the university's highest teaching honor. This year's recipients are electrical engineering doctoral candidate Max Kamenetsky; biological sciences doctoral candidate Virginia Matzek; Assistant Professor of English Brett Bourbon; and Tom Byers, a professor (teaching) of management science and engineering and founder and director of the Stanford Technology Ventures Program.

Kamenetsky was cited for exemplary service as a teaching assistant and a teaching fellow in electrical engineering; for inspired teaching, excellent communication skills and a gift for making challenging topics clear and understandable; for professionalism, dependability and responsiveness, which make him a favorite among students, faculty, teaching assistants and staff; and for research that has resulted in significant contributions to the field of digital and adaptive signal processing.

Matzek was cited for exemplary work as a graduate teaching consultant, contributing to a wide range of services for other teaching assistants to help them improve as teachers; for developing and teaching the popular and highly regarded class, Restoration Ecology, while maintaining a full research program for her doctorate; for being an exceptionally charismatic teacher and a wonderful colleague; and for her deep engagement and tireless efforts on behalf of students that have set a new standard for excellence in teaching at Stanford.

Bourbon was cited for strong leadership and intellectual commitment to the English Department Honors Program in strengthening its intellectual rigor; for creating a challenging learning environment that pushes students to discover what is important and meaningful in their own work and the work of others; for thoughtful "interrogations" and support that encourage every student to contribute to discussions and collective struggles with intellectual problems; and for his uncommon gifts as a teacher and mentor, leading his students to declare that he "deserves all the teaching awards that exist."

Byers was cited for being an extraordinarily accessible and generous mentor and teacher, encouraging creativity and making each student feel valued; for his dedication to developing new courses and a cohesive curriculum, including the innovative Mayfield Fellows Program that fosters a special community of learning and has launched the distinguished careers of dozens of engineers, computer scientists and business majors; for exceptional leadership of the Stanford Technology Ventures Program, empowering students to make the transition from academic to professional lives; and for his contagious enthusiasm for entrepreneurship and teaching scores of students to think strategically, analyze rigorously and live successfully.

Dinkelspiel AwardThe Lloyd W. Dinkelspiel Award, named after the president of the Board of Trustees who served from 1953 to 1958, recognizes distinctive contributions to undergraduate education or the quality of student life at Stanford. This year's recipients are Sarala V. Nagala, a senior in the Public Policy Program; H. Jazmin Quill, lecturer in the Psychology Department; Vivian Fu-Ning Wang, a senior in the Management Science and Engineering Department; and Adrienne Jamieson, the Mary Lou and George Boone Centennial Director of the Stanford in Washington Program.

Nagala was cited for enthusiastic leadership of the Stanford Pre-Law Society, promoting interaction among undergraduates, faculty and elected representatives; for her role in the creation of the student-initiated public policy course, The Supreme Court in Our Lifetime, and for accommodating the overflow of interested students; for her thoughtful mentoring and friendship, and for the joy she brought to her role as head peer academic coordinator in Junipero House; and for her outstanding scholarship, intellectual curiosity and generosity in service to others.

Quill was cited for her leadership in program development and curriculum design as co-director of the Psychology One Program; for her commitment, infectious enthusiasm and unequivocal joy in teaching; for creating an environment for graduate students that supports and encourages excellence in teaching as well as scholarship; and for her extraordinary effect on Stanford undergraduates, inspiring within them intellectual excitement and a passion for the study of psychology.

Wang was cited for her enthusiasm first as a Cantor Arts Center student guide and later as coordinator of the Student Guide Training Series, and her commitment to sharing with others her deep appreciation for the university's collections; for increasing awareness of the Cantor Center among undergraduates through her coordination of the innovative "First Thursdays"; for her singularity and excellence as an artistic "techie," bridging her seemingly disparate interests in management science and engineering and art history; and for the grace, good humor and quiet radiance she brings to all her endeavors.

Jamieson was cited for extraordinary leadership of the Stanford in Washington Program (SIW), where she has developed an engaging learning environment for all students and directed a dedicated and hardworking staff; for her relentless pursuit of excellence, strengthening the SIW Council, expanding the physical facility, establishing a new distance learning center and developing the most well-respected residential academic program in the nation's capital; for her balance of compassion and professionalism in teaching and the enthusiasm and excitement she conveys in her seminars on policy making in Washington or press and politics; and for her many roles?as professor, academic adviser, resident fellow, internship coordinator, tour leader and resident diplomat.