Historian, epidemiologist selected for volunteer-service award

Roland Prize winners Al Camarillo and Marilyn Winkleby will be honored at May 3 luncheon and split $5,000 award

Al Camarillo

Al Camarillo

Marilyn Winkleby

Marilyn Winkleby

History Professor Al Camarillo and Associate Professor of Medicine Marilyn Winkleby will receive the Miriam Aaron Roland Volunteer Service Prize at the second annual Community Partnerships Awards Luncheon on May 3, in honor of their outstanding personal commitment to community service and willingness to engage students in integrating academic scholarship with significant volunteer service to society.

The Roland Prize was established by alumna Miriam Roland of Montreal, Canada, through an endowment at the Haas Center for Public Service. The prize recognizes the role that public service by faculty can play in higher education—benefiting students, communities and the faculty themselves. The prize includes a $5,000 cash reward that is split between the two winners.

Winkleby is an epidemiologist in the School of Medicine. Her research is congruent with a number of public service activities and youth mentoring programs, including the Stanford Medical Youth Science Program, which addresses the critical lack of diversity in medical research and the health professions. The summer residential program, which Winkleby founded in 1988, has offered academic enrichment in the biomedical sciences, as well as college and career guidance, to more than 400 low-income high school students. Promising disadvantaged high school students from Central and Northern California are recruited from tough rural and urban environments, with hundreds of Stanford undergraduate and medical students serving as their mentors and teachers.

Camarillo, a faculty member in the Department of History since 1975, was named the Haas Centennial Professor in Public Service in 2001. He served as founding director of the Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity from 1996 to 2001. Camarillo received the Roland Prize for pioneering innovation in teaching that extends the classroom into the community in his course Poverty and Homelessness in America. He also is being recognized for his engaged and thoughtful community leadership on issues of homelessness through service as a trustee for Shelter Network, a Burlingame-based nonprofit that provides housing and support services on the Peninsula. Camarillo has inspired numerous students to integrate service and scholarship through coursework and research focused on the least advantaged, thereby transforming his students' decisions about careers and graduate study.

Camarillo was born and raised in the South Central Los Angeles community of Compton; his research and service-learning activities have brought him and his students back to his home community in recent years. He has published six books and many articles dealing with the experiences of Mexican Americans and other racial and immigrant groups in U.S. cities.