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Stanford Report, October 7, 1998

Hoover acquires Siniavki papers: 10/7/98

Hoover Institution acquires papers of Russian writer and right activist, Siniavski

The Hoover Institution has acquired the papers of the Russian writer and human rights activist Andrei Siniavski. Siniavski's writings and his trial for allegedly publishing anti-Soviet slander in foreign countries are considered key in mobilizing the human rights movement that contributed in significant ways to the forces that discredited and toppled the Soviet system. "Siniavski was a writer whose fiction provoked the regime to frenzy and galvanized the movement that eventually brought it down," said Hoover Institution Senior Research Fellow Robert Conquest after hearing about the acquisition.

Beginning in the 1950s, Siniavski sent abroad writings under the pseudonym Abram Tertz that he could not publish legally in the Soviet Union. He was arrested in 1965, tried in 1966 and sentenced to forced labor.

Demonstrations against the trial galvanized young intellectuals, among them Vladimir Bukovsky and Alexander Ginzburg, and inducted them into the human rights movement. In response to international protests at Siniavski's mistreatment, the regime allowed him to emigrate to France in 1973.

Siniavski's wife, Maria Rozanova, also publicized her husband's plight and refused to leave the Soviet Union without his papers. Authorities relented in order to dispatch her abroad, and she was able to save the record of her husband's life and work.

Once in the west, Siniavski taught at the Sorbonne, served as a visiting professor at Stanford and received an honorary doctorate from Harvard. He died in 1977.

The collection contains biographical information on Siniavski and his father, who was arrested for political activity; unpublished manuscripts and correspondence from before his arrest; materials on smuggling his manuscripts abroad, including secret codes he used; evidence of his influence on students at Moscow University; evidence of people spying on him; materials on his arrest and trial; a copy of the KGB interrogation files, notes on the search of his home and photographs from the early days of the human rights movement; papers from the emigration and continuing human rights activities abroad, including broadcasts for Radio Liberty and tapes of complete interviews and sections not broadcast; and papers on emigre politics.

The collection is expected to be available for research by spring 1999. For more information, contact Hoover Institution archivist Elena Danielson at 723-3563 or danielson@hoover. SR