Stanford in the News

Q-and-A: Larry Diamond on political change in Hong Kong

This article is an interview with Larry Diamond, senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, on the prospects for political liberalization in Hong Kong and the Chinese mainland.

Stockton bankruptcy ruling will decide fate of public pensions

This article quotes Michelle Anderson, professor at the law school, on the immediate implications if U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Christopher M. Klein chooses to reject Stockton, Calif.'s city-approved plan for ending its bankruptcy.

America's first website returns to life, thanks to Stanford researchers

This article features Stanford Wayback, which archives historic Web content such as the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, among the first websites.

Demystifying the MOOC

This article quotes Sebastian Thrun, professor (research) of computer science, on the varying benefits of the basic massive open online course (MOOC), depending on the student.

Eight foods you're about to lose due to climate change

This article quotes David Lobell, associate professor of environmental Earth system science and senior fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute and at the Woods Institute for the Environment, on the effect of climate change on agriculture.

Recent college graduates are pushing lower-income African Americans out of cities

This article cites Rebecca Diamond, assistant professor at the Graduate School of Business, on her research findings that as college graduates occupied larger shares of work forces in cities such as Chicago, New York, San Francisco and Washington D.C., income inequality in these cities grew.

What Prop. 46 would fix

This article is co-authored by Nora Engstrom and Robert Rabin, professors at the law school, and Michelle Mello, professor at the law school and of health research and policy, on California Proposition 46, which would among other provisions reset California's cap on noneconomic damages recoverable in medical malpractice cases based on inflation.

Ebola-quarantined U.S. nurse to sue in test of states' policies

This article quotes Michelle Mello on an upcoming federal lawsuit from a nurse quarantined in accordance with New Jersey's mandatory quarantine for certain travelers from Ebola-stricken West Africa.

Not everyone wants to be happy

This article is co-written by Jennifer Aaker, professor at the Graduate School of Business, on recent research into cultural differences in the desire for personal happiness.

Just how close is that Colorado Senate race? Polls differ.

This article quotes Douglas Rivers, professor of political science and senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, on the wide variation in midterm polls in the predictions of who is going to turn out to vote in Colorado's U.S. Senate race.

Chasing away the democracy blues

This article is written by Larry Diamond, senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, on why democracy is worth fighting for.

What happens when students control their own education?

This article quotes Linda Darling-Hammond, professor at the Graduate School of Education and faculty director of the Stanford Center for Opportunity Policy in Education, on the benefits of a student-centered teaching model.

Getting more poor kids into college won't fix income inequality

This article cites research co-authored by Caroline Hoxby, professor of economics and senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, and Christopher Avery of Harvard on their findings that "the vast majority of low-income high achievers do not apply to any selective college"; also cites Sean Reardon, professor at the Graduate School of Education, on the increasing achievement gap between children from high- and low-income families.

How investment firms are changing philanthropy

This article quotes Rob Reich, associate professor of political science, on how the expanding inequality gap could be influencing where donors give.

Brain games exploit anxieties about memory loss for profit -- scientists

This article quotes Laura Carstensen, professor of psychology and director of the Stanford Center on Longevity, on the scant evidence to date that the kinds of training offered by "brain games" have generalized effects to everyday life.

A company that profits as it pampers workers

This article quotes Nicholas Bloom, professor of economics and senior fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, on his study findings with colleagues that "more productive, faster growing and better managed firms offer their employees a more attractive work-life balance package."

Home solar power discounts are worker perk in new program

This article quotes Dan Reicher, professor of the practice at the law school and executive director of the Steyer-Taylor Center for Energy Policy and Finance at Stanford University, on how environmental advocacy organizations are increasingly working with businesses to influence energy policy as well as markets; this dovetails with a growing corporate focus on clean technologies.

Good teaching is not about playing it safe

This article quotes Larry Cuban, professor emeritus at the Graduate School of Education, on why teachers may be skeptical of technology.

Brain-training companies get advice from some academics, criticism from others

This article quotes Laura Carstensen, professor of psychology and director of the Stanford Center on Longevity, on a recent statement co-authored by the Stanford Center for Longevity and Berlin's Max Planck Institute for Human Development, which objected "to the claim that brain games offer consumers a scientifically grounded avenue to reduce or reverse cognitive decline."

Keene pumpkin riots bring police militarization to the forefront--again

This article quotes David Sklansky, professor at the law school, on the large increase over recent decades in the availability of SWAT equipment and the formation of SWAT units across the United States.

The quest to put more reality in virtual reality

This article quotes Jeremy Bailenson, associate professor of communication and senior fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment, on how High Fidelity, a new platform for virtual worlds, breaks new ground in communication in virtual worlds.

Nation's wealthy places pour private money into public schools, study finds

This article quotes Rob Reich, associate professor of political science, on how the inequities in local philanthropic fundraising, which is unregulated and tax-deductible for donors, mirrors the growth in wealth among the richest 1 percent overall.

Does your average scientist need an ethicist on call?

This article quotes Mildred Cho, professor (research) of pediatrics and associate director of the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics, on how the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethic's consults with drug firms are treated as a scholarly activity as well as a service.

Technology and inequality

This article quotes David Grusky, professor of sociology and director of the Center on Poverty and Inequality and Vivek Wadhwa on the disparity between the wealthy and everyone else, and technology's role in it; cites Sean Reardon, professor at the Graduate School of Education.

Can you Uber a burger?

This article quotes Al Roth, professor of economics and senior fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, on the disadvantages of services that sells reservations for tables at peak times.