Stanford in the News

Why it pays to be a jerk

This article quotes Robert Sutton, professor of management science and engineering, and Jeffrey Pfeffer, professor at the Graduate School of Business, on the advantages of being a leader behaving unpleasantly.

Playing the granny card

This article quotes Shelley Correll, professor of sociology, on how being senior or being a grandmother does appear to help women get past a competence/likability bind.

How an off-the-cuff remark shaped Jeb Bush's economic vision for US

This article quotes John Taylor, professor of economics and senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, on factors that would contribute to a 4 percent annual growth of the U.S. economy, chosen by former Florida Governor Jeb Bush as an overarching goal.

Scientists sample the ocean and find tiny additions to the Tree of Life

This article quotes Stephen Palumbi, director of the Hopkins Marine Station, professor of biology and senior fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment, commenting on studies from a four-year expedition that sampled microbes from across the world's oceans.

BearCat truck maker unruffled by Obama's order

This article quotes David Sklansky, professor of law, on how a softer tone from the White House on policing could encourage law enforcement to refocus on building trust in the neighborhoods they serve.

Small business is key in presidential campaign playbook

This article quotes Paul Oyer, professor at the Graduate School of Business, on how the minimum wage is a tricky issue for presidential candidates.

Are new Common Core tests better than old multiple-choice exams?

This article quotes Linda Darling-Hammond, professor emeritus at the Graduate School of Education, on how including more in-depth questions in Common Core tests makes up for some of what was lost after the passage of the federal No Child Left Behind Act of 2001.

Prospect of home-brew opiates demonstrates the wild and woolies of synthetic biology

This article quotes Christina Smolke, associate professor of bioengineering, on how making opiates from yeast will require very specialized and highly controlled fermentation conditions, which are not readily accessible to nonspecialists; also quotes Hank Greely, professor of law, noting that a new technology to manipulate genes may make it relatively easy for a criminal syndicate to engineer an opiate-producing yeast strain.

Our trouble with trains

This article is written by Richard White, professor of history, on how America's long love-hate relationship with the railroads has served to render the country's railroad problems so intractable.

Indian subcontinent's quake-causing collision course

This article quotes Simon Klemperer, professor of geophysics, on the geological questions surrounding the Indian subcontinent's collisions with Asia.

Lighting the brain

This article features Karl Deisseroth, professor of bioengineering, of psychiatry and of behavioral sciences, on his optogenetics breakthrough.

New York fracking report underscores quake, climate risks

This article quotes Robert B. Jackson, professor of environmental Earth system science and senior fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment and at the Precourt Institute for Energy, on the most obvious climate change question: Will abundant natural gas and cheap natural gas lead to the phaseout of coal-fired power plants or slow the adoption of renewable electricity?

What you get when you blend a drone and a gecko

This article features research co-authored by Stanford and University of Pennsylvania researchers on enabling a quadcopter drone to stick a landing at any angle, similar to a flying gecko or a bat; mentions Mark Cutkosky, professor of mechanical engineering (design), and quotes David Christensen, graduate student in mechanical engineering.

Senate targets China in currency manipulation bill

This article quotes John B. Taylor, professor of economics and senior fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, commenting that it is not a good idea to put currency issues into a trade agreement.

Lonely Republican voices buck party to urge action on climate change

This article quotes Jon Krosnick, professor of communication and of political science and affiliate at the Stanford Woods Institute, on Republican Rep. Carlos Curbelo's call for legislation to address climate change; mentions survey findings by Stanford, the New York Times and Resources for the Future.

Why Uber wants Here

This article quotes J. Christian Gerdes, professor of mechanical engineering, on the increasing importance of driving car-sharing, ride-sharing and autonomy. Uber is reportedly in the running to acquire Here, Nokia's mapping service.

Blue whales, unused to dodging, at risk from ships: Stanford biologist

This article features Stanford study findings that blue whales are vulnerable to cargo ship strikes because they are so used to being the largest animal in the ocean that they often fail to avoid the vessels; quotes Jeremy Goldbogen, assistant professor of biology and a senior author on the study.

Ski towns mull future without skiing - and put coal in the crosshairs

This article quotes Michael Wara, associate professor of law, on how companies that mine coal from public land leased by the federal government could be charged more in royalties to create a fund or create an incentive not to use the fuels.

US steps up scrutiny of movie distribution

This article quotes Michelle Mello, professor of law and of health research and policy, on objecting to nondisclosure agreements that prohibit plaintiffs from talking to regulatory bodies, such as state boards of medical licensing.uotes Mark Lemley, professor of law and senior fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, on whether there are a few dominant theater chains entering into deals that make it harder for independent companies to establish themselves and gain ground.

In malpractice settlements, injured parties often agree to keep mum

This article quotes Michelle Mello, professor of law and of health research and policy, on objecting to nondisclosure agreements that prohibit plaintiffs from talking to regulatory bodies, such as state boards of medical licensing.

California court deals pharma a setback in the pay-to-delay debate

This article quotes Mark Lemley, professor of law and senior fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, on the significance of a recent ruling by a California appeals court that a pay-to-delay settlement between drug makers violated state anti-trust law.

How to win any popular game, according to data scientists

This article cites research co-authored by Persi Diaconis, professor of statistics and of mathematics; Susan Holmes, professor of statistics and a fellow in undergraduate education; and Richard Montgomery of the University of California, Santa Cruz, on coin tossing and spinning probabilities.

Ending the presidential-debate duopoly

This article is written by Larry Diamond, senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, on how including a third-party candidate would reinvigorate American democracy.

With US eyes on Iran, North Korea's nuclear arsenal expanded

This article quotes Siegfried Hecker, professor (research) of management science and engineering and a senior fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute, on his doubts about recent claims by American military officials that North Korea was on the verge of shrinking a nuclear weapon to fit on a long-range missile capable of hitting the western United States. Hecker was the first American invited to see North Korea's main nuclear facility.

How satellites can monitor California's underground water

This article quotes Rosemary Knight, professor of geophysics, on how better data will help geologists and hydrologists address the state's water woes; mentions Jessica Reeves, postdoctoral scholar in geophysics.