Stanford in the News

America's Greece?

This article quotes Joshua Rauh, professor at the Graduate School of Business and senior fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, on the true cost of Illinois's true unfunded pension liability; the state has the highest number of public-pension funds close to insolvency.

Survey: Will we give up privacy without a fight?

This article quotes Paul Saffo, associate professor (consulting) on how privacy has shifted from being a right to a good that is purchased.

What MOOCs teach us

This article is written by Daphne Koller, professor (consulting) of computer science, on online education as one effective way to close the skills gap.

Stanford aims to bring player pianos back to life

This article features Stanford's Player Piano Project, an ambitious effort to restore and study instruments known as reproducing pianos that recorded major composers performing their own work in the early 20th century; quotes Jerry McBride, head librarian at the music library; George Barth, professor (teaching) of music; and Kumaran Arul, lecturer in music.

Law school trigger warnings?

This article quotes Robert Weisberg, professor of law, on his care in approaching how he teaches "typical" sexual assault cases in his criminal law course.

Brain scans shed light on how to sell bargains

This article features research co-authored by Baba Shiv, professor at the Graduate School of Business; Brian Knutson, associate professor of psychology; and Uma R. Karmarkar of Harvard Business School, which found that viewing a product's price before the product itself makes consumers more likely to focus on whether a it is worth its price, and consequently can help induce the purchase of specific kinds of bargain-priced items.

Keep snuggly warm with self-heating nanowire clothes

This article features research by Yi Cui, associate professor of materials science and engineering, and of photon science, on developing a technique for coating textiles in a network of silver nanowires; the nanowire cloth acts as a reflecting surface for heat, keeping the wearer warm, but is porous enough to let water through so the wearer doesn't feel sweaty.

Causes favored by US elites see good holiday tithings: economy

This article quotes Rob Reich, associate professor of political science, on how charities favored by the wealthy are gaining an increasing share in the philanthropic economy, which is a trend symptomatic of wealth inequality.

Study to examine effects of artificial intelligence

This article notes that Stanford will host a century-long study of the effects of artificial intelligence on society; the project is unusual because of its duration and its goal of tracking the effects of these technologies as they reshape the roles played by human beings in a broad range of endeavors.

For police reformers, California city shows a rough road

This article quotes Robert Weisberg, professor of law, on how a changed perspective of police officers in Oakland, Calif., illustrates how police departments often need strict controls, tough scrutiny and even threats of punishment to change the behavior of officers.

50-mile rule uproots immigrant children living in seasonal farmworker housing in California

This article quotes Amado Padilla, professor of education, on the importance of assisting children living in seasonal worker housing; about 90 percent eventually drop out of school.

College for grown-ups

This op-ed is written by Mitchell Stevens, associate professor at the Graduate School of Education, on rethinking the four-year model of residential campus life.

Can a school's tech program take a rural town out of poverty?

This article quotes Larry Cuban, professor emeritus at the Graduate School of Education, on how student engagement with more technology in the classroom could be temporary.

Computers are better at flirting than we are

This article features study findings by Dan Jurafsky, professor of linguistics and of computer science, that while women can judge with 62 percent accuracy when a man was flirting with them, and men can judge flirtatious behavior correctly 56 percent of the time, a Stanford researchers' flirtation-detection system was able to correctly judge flirting with 71 percent accuracy.

CIA unlikely to lose power in wake of interrogation report

This article quotes Amy Zegart, senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and co-director of the Center for International Security and Cooperation, on the "new reality" of intelligence officials working in a constant state of crisis while being asked to confront history's most complex threat environment.

Dollree Mapp, who defied police search in landmark case, is dead

This article quotes Jeffrey Fisher, professor (research) at the law school, on the exclusionary rule, which requires courts to suppress evidence gathered illegally.

Proof that you should get a life

This article features a new paper by John Pencavel, professor of economics and senior fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, that finds reducing working hours can be good for productivity.

Venture capital is facing up to its diversity problem

This article quotes Vivek Wadhwa, fellow at the Rock Center for Corporate Governance, on venture capital as the "last bastion of the boys club" in the technology industry.

Stanford, Rice, Notre Dame, Air Force are academic Final Four

This article notes that Stanford tops the list of college football's bowl-bound winners, based on its graduation success rate (99 percent).

Time for Apple, Amazon to step up on full disclosure

This article quotes Vivek Wadhwa, fellow at the Rock Center for Corporate Governance, on the "airbrushed gender and diversity data" that has been released thus far by Amazon.com and Apple.

Formation of life's building blocks recreated in lab

This article quotes David Sklansky, professor at the law school, on the contrast between the percentage of women hired in most law enforcement agencies (20-25 percent) and the percentage of women hired in the U.S. Border Patrol.uotes Donald Lowe, professor of geological and environmental sciences, on the likelihood that lagoons, or shallow-water protected settings, were well-developed on the early Earth.

US Border Patrol looking to hire more women for Mexican border

This article quotes David Sklansky, professor at the law school, on the contrast between the percentage of women hired in most law enforcement agencies (20-25 percent) and the percentage of women hired in the U.S. Border Patrol.

The rise of China's entrepreneurial spirit

This article mentions the Graduate School of Business' program Stanford Ignite, which recently premiered its Beijing program at Peking University; quotes Yossi Feinberg, professor at the Graduate School of Business and faculty director of Stanford Ignite.

What next?

This article cites a forthcoming paper co-authored by Mark Duggan, professor of economics and senior fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research; Audrey Guo, graduate student in economics; and Courtney Coile of Wellesley College, that found from 1980-2000, veterans were more likely than other workers to have jobs or be looking for work.

The Red Cross' 'world-class' lie

This article quotes Rob Reich, associate professor of political science, on the Red Cross' claim that it consistently meets its target of using an average of 91 cents of every dollar spent for "humanitarian services."