Stanford in the News

Blueprint for saving the world: Why the solution to global warming is staring us right in the face

This article cites Mark Z. Jacobson, professor of civil and environmental engineering and senior fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy and at the Woods Institute for the Environment, on estimating how much energy would be needed to power different areas, such as New York state.

The vocabulary of food

This article features Dan Jurafsky, professor of linguistics and of computer science, on his recent book "The Language of Food."

Treadmill desk to counteract the sedentary lifestyle of sitting all day

This article quotes Dan Schwartz, professor at the Graduate School of Education, on the best walking pace to benefit cognition.

Wind turbines kill fewer birds than do cats, cell towers

This article quotes Terry Root, senior fellow at the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment, on how wind power ultimately benefits birds.

Study: Water contamination in frack-happy Texas and Pennsylvania is anything but natural

This article quotes Robert B. Jackson, professor of environmental Earth system science and senior fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment and at the Precourt Institute for Energy, and co-author of a study that found faulty wells, not deep underground fracking, are the main reason that natural gas extraction from shale rock has contaminated drinking water in parts of Texas and Pennsylvania.

Study: Leaky wells, not fracking, taint water

This article quotes Robert B. Jackson, professor of environmental Earth system science and senior fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment and at the Precourt Institute for Energy, and co-author of a study that found fracking didn't cause cases of tainted groundwater in areas of Pennsylvania and Texas; rather, the contamination was due to problems in pipes and seals in natural gas wells.

Documents reveal how poultry firms systematically feed antibiotics to flocks

This article quotes Donald Kennedy, emeritus Stanford president and emeritus professor of biology and former U.S. Food and Drug Administration commissioner, on the dangers of routinely feeding antibiotic drugs to poultry for extended periods.

A simple plan to stop the next financial crisis

This article cites Anat Admati, professor at the Graduate School of Business, on her suggestion with German economist Martin Hellwig that banks should borrow less, relative to their assets, in order to prevent the next global financial crisis.

Caging the Li-ion

This article features research by Yi Cui, associate professor of materials science and engineering and of photon science, and his team, which includes Steven Chu, professor of physics and of molecular and cellular physiology; quotes Cui.

Economists want more spending on roads and bridges - here's why

This article quotes Darrell Duffie, professor at the Graduate School of Business, on the importance of infrastructure spending.

Fingerprint words

This article quotes Benoît Monin, professor at the Graduate School of Business and of psychology, on responding to situations in which someone uses language differently than we do, or words we're unfamiliar with.

Loan forgiveness isn't the best use of government resources, paper says

This article cites a new paper co-authored by Arvind Krishnamurthy, professor at the Graduate School of Business, and Janice Eberly of Northwestern University, which found that government policies to fund mortgage debt reduction for underwater homeowners, while helpful, are a less efficient use of government resources than other types of mortgage relief, including refinancing.

Four ways to fix our retirement system

This article cites John Shoven, professor of economics and director of the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, on the benefits of offering Social Security payroll tax relief to help repair America's retirement system.

Blue and red states going green on energy policy

This article qeatures the "State Clean Energy Cookbook," a new report co-authored by Stanford and the Hoover Institution, which found that politically "red" and "blue" states are increasingly turning green as they push energy efficiency and renewable power to save money and protect the planet; quotes George P. Shultz, distinguished fellow at the Hoover Institution, and cites Dan Reicher, professor of the practice of law and executive director of the Steyer-Taylor Center for Energy Policy and Finance.

On the anniversary of 9/11, committing to national service as an American value

This article is co-written by Condoleezza Rice, former U.S. secretary of state, professor of political science and business, and senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, and Robert Gates, former Secretary of Defense, on how national service can build America's global image abroad and at home.

Samsung Vietnam phone leap has farmhand living a dream

This article quotes Scott Rozelle, senior fellow and co-director of the Rural Education Action Program at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, on Vietnam's natural advantages over China as a manufacturing hub.

Is the Internet about to get sloooooow?

This article is written by Barbara van Schewick, professor at the law school and faculty director of the Center for Internet and Society, on today's online protest by organizations, including major tech firms, against the Federal Communications Commission's proposed rules for net neutrality.

Apple watch: coming to a classroom near you?

This article quotes BJ Fogg, professor (consulting) at the Graduate School of Education and director of the Persuasive Tech Lab, on the possible pitfalls of bringing devices such as the new Apple Watch into the classroom.

OK Go: Apple ripped off our video

This article quotes Mark Lemley, professor at the law school and senior fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, on OK Go's band manager's opinion that Apple's recent product event video is very similar to a popular OK Go music video.

Violence at home costs $8 trillion a year, worse than war: study

This article quotes James Fearon, professor of political science and senior fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, and a co-author with Anke Hoeffler of Oxford University of a recent study that found domestic violence, mainly against women and children, kills many more people than wars and is an often overlooked expensive scourge.

Scotland is now separate, even if Scots vote no

This article quotes Nicholas Bloom, professor of economics and senior fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, on similarities between Montreal's potential separation from Canada and Scotland's potential separation from the United Kingdom.

Could Navy submarine smoking ban lead military to quit?

This article quotes Robert Proctor, professor of history, on study findings that the U.S. Navy ban on smoking aboard submarines may offer lessons for enacting similar prohibitions in other parts of the military as well as in civilian life.

Climate change will disrupt half of North America's bird species, study says

This article quotes Terry Root, senior fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment and board member of the National Audubon Society, on a recent study by the National Audubon Society, which found that climate change is likely to so alter the bird population of North America that about half of the approximately 650 species will be driven to smaller spaces or forced to find new places to live, feed and breed over the next 65 years.

Bills regulating state's groundwater not an instant fix for aquifers

This article quotes Barton "Buzz" Thompson, co-director of and senior fellow at the Stanford Woods Institute and professor at the law school, on the package of bills designed to regulate groundwater supplies in California; the bills are awaiting Gov. Jerry Brown's signature.

NYC immigrant public defender system breaks ground

This article quotes Jayashri Srikantiah, professor (teaching) at the law school and founding director of the Immigrants' Rights Clinic, on the impact of a person's deportation on those around them.