Stanford in the News

Cavity and oral cancer diagnosis with smartphones

This article cites work by Manu Prakash, assistant professor of bioengineering, on a device that helps diagnose oral cancer at an early stage.

Private equity and hedge funds tempt business school graduates

This article quotes Maeve Richard, assistant dean and director of the Career Management Center at the Graduate School of Business, on the decreased percentage of MBA students going into investment banking, following the financial crisis.

Second Life 2.0: Virtual world recreates the real you

This article quotes Jeremy Bailenson, associate professor of communication, director of the Virtual Human Interaction Lab and senior fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment, on High Fidelity, a prototype virtual world designed by the creator of Second Life.

Obama has finally made it to Asia. But the crisis in Ukraine is stealing the spotlight.

This article quotes Daniel Sneider, associate director for research at the Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center, on the reaction of the United States' Asian allies to matters of concern for America.

Putin's military exercises are more than a game

This article quotes Ian Morris, professor of classics, on the possible meanings of military exercises.

Take notes, Nate Silver! Reinventing literary criticism with computers.

This article is an interview with Franco Moretti, professor of English and of comparative literature, on his work as director of the Stanford Literary Lab.

US Justice Department announces clemency review of drug offenders

This article qotes Robert Weisberg, professor at the law school and co-director of the Stanford Criminal Justice Center, on new clemency guidelines that are expected to make thousands of drug offenders eligible for a reduction in the sentences they are currently serving.

Google's stake in $2 billion Apple-Samsung trial revealed

This article quotes Mark Lemley, professor at the law school and senior fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, on the disparity in payouts sought by Samsung Electronics Co. and Apple Inc. in their current court case.

Ten breakthrough technologies, 2014: genome editing

This article quotes Hank Greely, professor at the law school, on the potential consequences of genome editing.

Ten breakthrough technologies, 2014: brain mapping

This article mentions Karl Deisseroth, professor of bioengineering, of psychiatry and of behavioral sciences, on developing a new technique that allows scientists to directly see the structures of neurons and circuitry in an intact brain.

We need good science, good engineering, good regulations and good enforcement

This is an interview with Mark Zoback, professor of geophysics and senior fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy, on the problems and potential of hydraulic fracking in California.

Science tools anyone can afford

This article features Manu Prakash, assistant professor of bioengineering, on distributing powerful yet inexpensive laboratory instruments as a way to spread science and medical opportunity around the globe.

Brain control in a flash of light

This article features Karl Deisseroth, professor of bioengineering, of psychiatry and of behavioral sciences, on developing optogenetics, a technique that allows researchers to turn brain cells on and off with a combination of genetic manipulation and pulses of light; also mentions Michelle Monje, assistant professor of neurology and Deisseroth's wife.

JPGoldman Stanley intact as Basel change keeps bank ties

This article quotes Anat Admati, professor at the Graduate School of Business, on the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision's decision to loosen proposed limits on the financial web that led to investor panic in 2008 and prompted bailouts.

The fat returns in Social Security

This article quotes John Shoven, professor of economics and director of the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, on the advantages for married couples of waiting to collect Social Security.

Democrats confront vexing politics over the health care law

This article quotes David M. Kennedy, professor emeritus of history and at the Graduate School of Business, on comparing the popularity of Medicare and Social Security versus the Affordable Care Act.

How the US made its Putin problem worse

This article quotes Michael McFaul, professor of political science and senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, on reviewing Russian policy following President Barack Obama's 2008 election victory.

We're working less; is that really so bad?

This article cites Robert Hall, professor of economics and senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, on his new paper examining the permanent effects of the U.S. economic recession.

Nuggets of corporate governance wisdom from Charlie Munger

This article cites a paper from David F. Larcker, professor at the Graduate School of Business and director of the Corporate Governance Research Program, and Brian Tayan, researcher in the Corporate Governance Research Program, on advice from Charlie Munger, vice-chairman of Berkshire Hathaway Corporation.

A better battery

This article is an interview with Steven Chu, professor of physics and of molecular and cellular physiology, and Yi Cui, associate professor of materials science and engineering and of photon science, on how an overhaul of the battery will jump-start a shift to renewable energy.

Stanford is tops for the most satisfied MBA graduates

This article notes that alumni of the Graduate School of Business rank first as having the most combined satisfaction from their MBA education, current job and preparedness relative to other MBAs.

Recession's lingering scars could include lower labor-force participation

This article quotes Robert Hall, professor of economics and senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, on his new paper that argues two features of the economic recovery from the U.S. recession - sluggish productivity growth and lower labor-force participation - may persist for years.

The traumatic, sensual, addicted language of restaurant reviews (and what it says about you)

This article cites research co-authored by Dan Jurafsky, professor of linguistics, with researchers from Carnegie Mellon University, on the "linguistic structure" of Yelp restaurant reviews.

Nevada rancher vs. federal agents: a very old conflict suddenly made new

This article quotes Richard White, professor of American history, on a confrontation between a Nevada rancher and the Bureau of Land Management over fees owed to the federal government for illegal grazing of federal lands.

Proof that the universe inflated rapidly after the Big Bang

This article quotes Chao-Lin Kuo, assistant professor of physics and of particle physics and astrophysics, on finding evidence for inflation theory, the idea that the universe rapidly expanded after the Big Bang.