Stanford in the News

Pentagon seeks to shed 'dreary' image to attract Silicon Valley talent

This article features Defense Secretary Ashton Carter's recent speech at Stanford, given as the annual Sidney Drell Lecture. Carter is a former visiting scholar at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, and Sidney Drell is a professor emeritus at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

Pentagon announces new strategy for cyberwarfare

This article features Defense Secretary Ashton Carter's recent speech at Stanford, given as the annual Sidney Drell Lecture. Carter is a former visiting scholar at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, and Sidney Drell is a professor emeritus at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. Also mentioned is Amy Zegart, senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, who held a Q&A with Carter.

How to get in on the sharing economy

This article quotes Paolo Parigi, assistant professor of sociology, on how the sharing economy often facilitates trust and cooperation.

Raisin farmers appear poised to win challenge of New Deal-era program

This article quotes law Professor Michael McConnell, who is representing raisin grower Marvin Horne.

Morphing wings allow drones to keep flying through midair collision

This article features research by David Lentink, assistant professor of mechanical engineering, and Amanda Stowers, graduate student in mechanical engineering, on designing a drone flight mechanism mimicking those found in nature that could take a beating and still maintain flight.

Opponents of gay marriage ponder strategy as issue reaches Supreme Court

This article quotes Jane Schacter, professor of law, on how the first wave of backlash against to state court decisions favoring same-sex marriage will not be repeated.

Launching a startup on your employer's dime

This article quotes Yossi Feinberg, professor at the Graduate School of Business and director of the GSB's Corporate Entrepreneur program, on why employees might be encouraged to begin their own businesses with the financial support of their employer.

Hillary Clinton's green path to the White House: will she be 'careful' on climate?

This article quotes Jon Krosnick, professor of communication and of political science and senior fellow at the Stanford Woods Institute, on the effects that presidential candidate Hillary Clinton's stating her basic position on climate change would have among voters; also mentions a recent survey on climate change by Stanford, the New York Times and Resources for the Future, of which Krosnick is a co-author.

What psychology tells us about student achievement - and how it is ignored

This blog post is co-authored by Geoffrey L. Cohen, professor at Graduate School of Education.

Moleskine notebooks adapt to the digital world

This article quotes William P. Barnett, professor in the Graduate School of Business, on the drawbacks of partnerships between traditional and digital firms.

String-pushers

This article cites research by Kenneth Schultz, professor of political science, on analyzing transfer payments in Britain from 1961 to 1992 and finding that as elections approach, governments may try to "sweeten" voters by increasing spending on, for example, child benefits.

Panel to hear appeal on Obama immigration actions

This article quotes Michael McConnell, professor of law and senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, on the need for judges to be very careful their ruling on the upcoming Obama administration's attempt to convince a federal appeals court to lift a lower-court ruling that has blocked the government from implementing the president's executive actions to shield undocumented immigrants from deportation and to grant them work permits.

Q&A: Stanford's Taylor argues for higher interest rates

This article is a Q&A with John Taylor, professor of economics and senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, about how monetary policy rules shape economic strategy.

Star Wars' moisture farming tech won't save California

This article quotes Barton Thompson, professor at the law school and co-director of the Woods Institute, on "moisture farms," which extract water from the atmosphere, as interesting, but not yet viable on a large scale.

Seattle CEO to cut his pay so every worker earns $70,000

This article quotes David Larcker, professor at the Graduate School of Business, on whether a Seattle CEO's decision to drastically cut his pay to help cover the cost of big raises for his employees may or may not start a trend.

US study finds teacher bias in discipline toward black students

This article features Stanford research findings that teachers in the United States were more likely to feel troubled when a black student misbehaved for a second time than when a white student did, highlighting a bias that shows why African-American children are more often disciplined than schoolmates; quotes one of the researchers, Jason Okonofua, graduate student in psychology.

Google joins its US peers under Europe's scrutiny

This article quotes Timothy Bresnahan, professor of economics and senior fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, on all the successful firms in the PC and early Web businesses that missed out on mobile technology or were late to it.

Global officials spar over interest rate policy

This article quotes John Taylor, professor of economics and senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, on repeating his long-held plea for central bankers to follow a set formula as they decide whether to raise or lower interest rates.

A new competitor for bitcoin aims to be faster and safer

This article features David Mazières, professor of computer science, on developing a Bitcoin-like system that can handle payments faster and with more security; quotes Mazières and Dan Boneh, professor of computer science and of electrical engineering.

Would you let the IRS prepare your taxes?

This article quotes Joseph Bankman, professor of law, on calling on the government to create a tax preparation method that would vastly reduce the time and cost of tax-filing for most people.

For Persi Diaconis' next magic trick...

This article features Persi Diaconis, professor of statistics and of mathematics, on analyzing how long it takes to "smoosh" a deck of cards--spreading them out on a table, swishing them around with one's hands and then gathering them up--in order to randomize the deck. Also mentions his collaborators Marc Coram, now an assistant professor of biostatistics in the School of Medicine, and Lauren Bandklayder, now a graduate student at Northwestern University.

The worst question you could ask women in a job interview

This article quotes Margaret Ann Neale, professor at the Graduate School of Business, on the need for women to negotiate salary offers for a new position.

Digital health records are not safe, report on breaches shows

This article quotes Mark A. Musen, professor of medical informatics, and Timothy Chou, affiliate in computer science, on co-authoring a recent study with Vincent Liu, of the Kaiser Permanente Division of Research in Oakland, which found that close to a thousand large data breaches affected 29 million medical records between 2010 and 2013.

I watch therefore I am: seven movies that teach us key philosophy lessons

This article includes commentary by Kenneth Taylor, professor of philosophy, on how the film "Memento" is a philosophical exploration of the nature of the self, and the role of memory in the making and unmaking of identity.

Why civil rights groups support standardized tests

This article quotes Sean Reardon, professor of education, on his findings that students of color were doing better at schools that risked sanctions if those students did not improve, but the gains were minor overall.