Stanford in the News

2015 Best Colleges preview: top 10 best value schools

This article notes that Stanford is among the top 10 national universities, according to a preview of the U.S. News & World Report 2015 Best Colleges rankings; the full rankings will be available Sept. 9.

'Immortal' cells from Henrietta Lacks lead to updated rules on genomic data sharing

This article quotes Hank Greely, professor at the law school and director of the Center for Law and the Biosciences, on the National Institutes of Health's (NIH) new requirement that human study participants be told that that their data may be broadly shared for future research.

The new political rating system that shows the stakes this year

This article quotes Adam Bonica, assistant professor of political science who developed the Crowdpac model, a new online service that gives an ideological score to all Congressional candidates, based on their donors and, for those who have held federal office before, their voting history.

Roadside adventures result in a book on business

This article is written by Paul Oyer, professor at the Graduate School of Business, on how his national travels led to his recent book, "Roadside M.B.A.," co-authored with Mike Mazzeo of Northwestern University and Scott Schaefero of the University of Utah.

'Holy Grail' battery scientist explains incredible breakthrough.

This article features Yi Cui, associate professor of materials science and engineering and of photon science, on taking a significant step toward designing a pure lithium battery anode.

Obama sets his own pace in a world whirling with crises

This article quotes David Kennedy, professor emeritus of history, on the world of proliferating aggressors and the palpable exhaustion of the American people for military engagement that President Barack Obama faces.

A new opium pipe

This article features research by Christina Smolke, associate professor of bioengineering, on using synthetic biology - the technique of moving genes from creature to creature by the handful, instead of one at a time - to make opiates without using opium poppies.

Social sciences suffer from severe publication bias

This article quotes Neil Malhotra, associate professor at the Graduate School of Business, on his recent study findings that most null results in a sample of social-science studies were never published.

Stanford law professor approved for spot on California Supreme Court

This article notes that Mariano-Florentino Cuéllar, professor at the law school, director of the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and senior fellow at the Woods Institute, has been confirmed to the California Supreme Court by a state commission; Cuéllar's name will appear on the November ballot for election to a 12-year term.

California's underground water war

This article create groundwater models that can manage supply and demand as the climate changes.

Why the 'unhiring' of Steven Salaita is a threat to academic freedom

This article is written by David Palumbo-Liu, professor in comparative literature, on the recent statement by the University of Illinois board of trustees about the university's rescindment of an official offer of a tenured professorial appointment.

Employees who work at home are more productive than office-dwellers

This article cites Nicholas Bloom, professor of economics and senior fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, on his study findings that employees who worked from home were more productive in a given week than they had previously been at the office.

When it comes to producing female entrepreneurs, Harvard, Stanford, MIT lead the way

This article notes that over the past five years, 40 women with undergraduate degrees from Stanford have received venture capital funding for companies they founded, more than any other top school; also notes that Stanford placed in the top five (for both undergraduates and MBAs) in a separate list ranking schools by the number of company founders of all genders that they produced.

What you should know about the 50+ job market

This article's interviewed experts include Adele Hayutin, senior research scholar and director of demographic analysis at the Stanford Center on Longevity, on why employers should keep their older workers.

Blacks, Latinos dominate Silicon Valley's 'invisible workforce'

This article quotes Margaret Neale, professor at the Graduate School of Business, on the status differential among Silicon Valley tech companies.

Modified yeast makes opiates for the first time

This article features research by Christina Smolke, associate professor of bioengineering, on using yeast to make opiates such as morphine and oxycodone from simple sugars, without using opium poppies.

Clouding talks, Ukraine says it captured Russian troops

This article quotes Michael McFaul, professor of political science, senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and former U.S. ambassador to Russia, on the difficulty of negotiating with Russian President Vladimir Putin regarding Russia's role in the conflict in eastern Ukraine.

Turnitin and the debate over anti-plagiarism software

This article quotes Thomas Dee, professor at the Graduate School of Education, on co-authoring a study exploring why students plagiarize.

A top net neutrality defender is trying to poke holes in Mozilla's plan for the open Internet

This article features Barbara van Schewick, professor at the law school, on three words that threaten to undermine Mozilla's proposal to regulate Internet service providers, or a part of what they do, as telecommunications services.

Ferguson and Gaza: The definitive study of how they are and are not similar

This article is written by David Palumbo-Liu, professor in comparative literature.

The secret language of food

This article is written by Dan Jurafsky, professor of linguistics.

Stanford's Taylor says US rate rise will help emerging markets

This article quotes John Taylor, professor of economics and senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, on how phasing out of the U.S. Federal Reserve's monetary stimulus will help emerging markets by ridding them of a source of turbulence.

Coal gas boom in China holds climate change risks

This article quotes Robert B. Jackson, professor of environmental Earth system science and senior fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment and at the Precourt Institute for Energy, on a study co-authored with Chi-Jen Yang of Duke University that found if all of China's planned coal-to-gas plants start up, the carbon dioxide they'd release would equal three-quarters of all energy-related carbon emissions in the United States.

One of the nation's most expensive ballot campaigns is heating up

This article quotes Bruce Cain, professor of political science, on California Proposition 46, which would raise the limit on malpractice payouts.

Wireless power for minuscule medical implants

This article features Ada Poon, assistant professor of electrical engineering, on developing a new method of sending magnetic fields well below skin level to power devices that would otherwise need batteries.