All Stories

Mapping the emotions of London

A digital humanities team sifts through two centuries of British novels and geography to see how London’s readers felt about different parts of their city.

Early federal budget proposal stirs concern

Stanford leaders say an early outline of the White House's federal budget proposals is cause for concern – but the process is long, and the university will be working with partners to make a strong case for research and education.

Stanford’s newest library opens in the former Old Chem

The Robin Li and Melissa Ma Science Library combines biology, chemical engineering, chemistry, mathematics and statistics collections in a bright, relaxing space sprinkled with hints of the building’s history.

Students recreate medieval feasts in new course

As part of a new humanities course, undergraduate students replicate the recipes and the ambience of ancient feasts in order to learn about how people lived in the Middle Ages.

How grass developed a better way to breathe

Grasses are better able to withstand drought or high temperatures than many other plants in large part due to changes in their pores, called stomata. Stanford scientists have discovered how grasses produce these altered pores, which could someday lead to crops that can better survive climate change.

Stanford Earth —

Navigating the guts of an ancient submarine canyon

Tourists flock to Point Lobos State Natural Reserve near Monterey, California, for its breathtaking coastal views. But the site has long attracted geologists for a very different reason.