All Stories

Evidence for a particle that is its own antiparticle

In a discovery that concludes an 80-year quest, Stanford and University of California researchers found evidence of particles that are their own antiparticles. These 'Majorana fermions’  could one day help make quantum computers more robust. See video here.

Tuna fin movement controlled by biological hydraulic systems

The unique system of hydraulic control of fins discovered in tuna indicates a new role for the lymphatic system in vertebrates. This natural mechanism may inspire designs for new "smart" control surfaces with changeable shape and stiffness for both air and underwater unmanned vehicles.

Self-perceptions linked to shorter lifespans

Stanford researchers found that U.S. adults who believed that they were less active than their peers died younger than those who believed they were more active – even if their actual activity levels were similar.

Stanford scholar examines international institutions

Rising nations such as China and India are seeking to play a greater role in the world’s most influential international organizations. How these organizations accommodate rising powers is at the heart of Stanford Professor Phillip Lipscy’s new book.

Stanford School of Engineering —

Exploring the biotechnology revolution

On the Future of Everything radio show, bioengineering professor Drew Endy discusses what's next for the bio-economy. The question, he says, is, how do we get smarter at designing living systems?

Stanford Medicine —

Physicians who tout well-being may scare off patients

Participants who were overweight believed that the fit doctors would disapprove of patients with unhealthy habits, and as a result overweight participants preferred physicians who did not advertise their fitness.

Stanford Law —

Future of the Office of Government Ethics

Stanford Law Professor Robert Gordon discusses law, ethics and ongoing questions about the president’s business ties and potential conflicts of interest with outgoing OGE Director Walter Shaub.